1-Find the attachment2-Respond to each post with a FULL Single-space paragraph3-A reliable reference for each paragraph4-Respond DO NOT summarize.5-Very important; you have to include your thoughts6-APA style7-4 responses in total8-At least 150 words each12345678-
Find the attachment
Respond to each post with a FULL Single-space paragraph
A reliable reference for each paragraph
Respond DO NOT summarize.
Very important; you have to include your thoughts
APA style
4 responses in total
At least 150 words each
Course: Healthcare Management
The assignment was:
“Is Barbera et al asking too much from “all personnel” identified in their competencies
framework document?
Defend and expand on your answer.”
Note from Professor: I want to continue to challenge you in your DB responses, go deeper, provide
examples to support your position.
Post#1
The term “all personnel” refers to all the individuals within the healthcare system that has a role
in emergency response regardless of their specific function. The expectations Barbera et al.
(2007) set forth as competencies ensure that the involved personnel understand the ICS
principles and the EOP, are capable of knowing when and how to activate the procedures, and
know what their roles and responsibilities are. All personnel must exhibit competencies in these
areas:







Utilize general Incident Command System (ICS) principles during incident response and
recovery
Recognize situations that suggest indications for full or partial activation of the healthcare
system’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), and report them appropriately and promptly
Participate in healthcare system mobilization to rapidly transition from day-to-day operations to
incident response organization and processes
Apply the healthcare system’;s core mission statement to your actions during emergency
response and recovery
Apply the healthcare system code of ethics to your actions during emergency operations
Execute your personal/family preparedness plans to maximize your availability to participate in
the healthcare system’s emergency response and recovery
Respond with your previously prepared and maintained personal “go-kit” to maximize your
ability to perform your assigned role during healthcare system response and recovery








Follow the general response procedures for all personnel in the Occupant Emergency Procedures
(OEP) and assist others (healthcare system personnel, patients, and visitors) as necessary to
accomplish the OEP directives
Perform your specific roles and responsibilities as assigned in the healthcare system’s Emergency
Operations Plan (EOP) and the appropriate Incident Action Plan (IAP) in order to support the
system’s objectives
Follow the Communication Plan and reporting requirements as outlined in the healthcare
system’s EOP and the specific Incident Action Plan for an emergency event.
Follow and enforce healthcare system’s safety rules, regulations, and policies during emergency
response and recovery
Follow and enforce police and security measures consistent with the nature of the incident hat
has prompted the EOP activation
Utilize or request (as appropriate) and integrate equipment, supplies, and personnel for your
specific role or functional area during emergency response and recovery
Follow demobilization procedures that facilitate rapid and efficient incident disengagement and
out-processing of individual resources and/or the overall healthcare organization
Follow recovery procedures that ensure facility return to baseline activity
Further competencies are also set for leaders and managers. The competencies set for all
personnel is the base guidelines for everyone. The expectations are set to be a standard as the
fulfillment of all the competencies by all personnel ensures that response to situations that
require EOP activation are recognized and handled accordingly. By ensuring that all personnels
know what to do and how to respond, emergency situations can be handled efficiently and
effectively, quickly mitigating damages and ensuring the safety of patients and personnel. While
the process is strict, it has the benefit of improving response and safety. As an individual a part
of the emergency response, the expectation that they know what the position entails is to be
expected, rather than being considered “too much.”
Post#2
Competence can be defined as a person’s ability, not just merely actively reacting to the
demands emerging from the surrounding environment. Still, it includes an individual’s
potentiality positively provide sensible and satisfactory responses (Jose & Dufrene, 2014). In any
profession, competence always plays an active role in aligning the knowledge, potentialities, and
expertise that are in line with the organization’s target that they are mandated to undertake
(Ingrassia et al.,2014). Barbera et al. in ‘VHA-EMA Emergency Response and Recovery
Competencies: Competency Survey, Analysis, and Report’ gives the clear picture of ‘all
personnel’ as all those educated individuals in an health care facility ranging from system
operators, licensed practitioners among others with specific special duties in any emergency
health care system (Gomez, & Cabilao-Valencia, 2015).
The article accordingly does not encourage the inclusion of all personnel but rather prefer
those with expertise in specific areas should be the ones to act respectively; this seems the core
objective by Barbera et al. (Gomez, & Cabilao-Valencia, 2015). A good number of roles
assigned to the groups known as ‘all persons’ is classified as an operations phase. It is
undisputed that at operations level is a point at which vital care is offered to save lives of victims
as an act of fast response to any emergency arising, for those classified as all persons and
mandated to play an active role here. As per the article, a total of fifteen individual
competencies are essential, from a close assessment, the impact at least every area of emergency
response(Ingrassia et al.,2014). The issue of who is specialized in what at the emergency
response is not to of consideration, since they all have a duty to enforce regulation. Realistically,
some instances come up and demand an individual to participate in a vital task for the single and
foremost reason for saving a life, leading to the stipulated required competencies expressed by
the description (Gomez, & Cabilao-Valencia, 2015).
The expression of the potential to exploit the incident command system (ICS) is the first
and foremost requirement among the other competencies. For instance, if at the ICS, the ‘all
persons’ for the day does not have or has limited skills, yet assigned to work at the casualty
section. The expected outcome will turn chaotic when discharging responsibilities, in
circumstances where etiquette has to be of consideration. ICS competence guarantees people’s
understanding of how the facility has to be set and what the facility has and how it should be
used in case of an emergency scenario(Yarmohammadian et al., 2011). Emergency services are
to be efficient; this is a proposition among the competence requirements, thus increasing the
possibility of an emergency plan being successful.
Considering what Barbera et al. anticipate from ‘all persons’ is unjust, furthermore
restricting the competence requirement when it comes to real life situations, hence, threatening
the emergence agenda. Time, human workforce, and cost become inadequate on occasions of
integrating competencies with a single clique of individuals, irrespective of their expertise.
Course: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS
The assignment was:
“Dealing with the mentally ill provides many challenges – clinical, social, emotional, etc.
Discuss the unique emergency preparedness needs of patients with emotional and
psychiatric patients.
State why this is so difficult for us to manage.”
For this week
“Offer either a supporting or refuting argument to your classmate’s
discussions. Conduct a search of materials on the internet to find
your points of discussion. Use these in your discussion and cite
correctly.” Not just a response
Post#1
According to the World Health Organization, almost everyone affected by emergencies is likely
to experience psychological distress. These disasters may leave some people with the posttraumatic disorder, depression, schizophrenia, and other mental illnesses. Emergencies have been
seen to be opportunities for building a sustainable mental health system for those in need.
Individuals with emotional and psychiatric require unique emergency preparedness. For instance,
social support, as well as community self-help, need to be strengthened. The emergency
preparedness can be done through the creation of community groups, which enables the members
to solve problems together. Also, those with psychiatric and emotional issues require
psychological first aid. This serves as a first-line practical and emotional support to those who
experience acute distress (WHO, 2019). Also, psychological interventions and basic clinical
mental health care need to be provided to these populations. This need to be offered by trained
community workers who need to be supervised and specialists in the social and health sector
While the unique emergency preparedness needs of patients with emotional and psychiatric
patients are essential, it is difficult to manage. One of the reasons is because individuals may
show a wide range of cognitive and psychological symptoms. Assessing those at high-risk thus
becomes difficult. Also, most of the survivors like to share disaster responses to members who
are close to them, such as family and friends (Math et al., 2015.) Therefore, it makes it hard to
know about their mental health progress.
Post#2
Q1- Discuss the unique emergency preparedness needs of patients with emotional and
psychiatric patients.
Patients with psychiatric and emotional needs are psychologically susceptible to swift
and unanticipated changes in their environment. As such, the understanding of the success of
outreach programs that engage persons with psychiatric and emotional needs is a unique
emergency preparedness need (Center for Mental Health Services, 1996). However, aspects
such as the value system, lifestyle and perceptual set also require attention.
Notably, mentally ill and psychiatric patients have similar basic needs as the general
population. Therefore, it is necessary to discourage artificial support systems, segregated service
systems, and illness when dealing with patients with psychiatric and emotional needs (Center for
Mental Health Services. 1996). Stressful reactions are likely to ensue following the impact of a
disaster and its aftermath. Emergency personnel should avoid attributing such reactions to
worsened cases of mental illness. The service engagement process is a unique feature that
addresses the needs of psychiatric and emotional patients that are associated with a disaster.
The emergency personnel should understand the perceptions of psychiatric and mentally
ill patients. In so doing, they can offer services that are consistent with patient needs and prevent
any reluctance in seeking help (McFarlane & Williams, 2012). Moreover, the ability to preplan
activities related to resource organization and mobilization helps to recognize the capabilities of
patients with psychiatric and emotional needs.
Q2- State why this is so difficult for us to manage.
The difficulty in managing the unique emergency preparedness needs for psychiatric and
mentally ill patients is attributed to the jurisdiction of the local governments (Center for Mental
Health Services, 1996). Notably, local governments transfer the responsibility to offer services
to mentally ill people during disasters to the State. Federal guidelines are also misunderstood
regarding the eligibility for mental health services related to disasters.
Moreover, the specification of crisis counseling and recovery services outlines that the
duty does not involve treatment but rather recognizing the patients and evaluating their needs.
The eventual goal is to help patients with emotional and psychiatric needs to access community
support services (McFarlane et al., 2012). The inability to identify the unique needs of
psychiatric and mentally ill patients causes stigma and isolation, hence a challenge in managing
unique emergency preparedness needs.
Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Appendix C
Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies:
Competency Framework Final Report 1
Joseph A. Barbera, MD, Anthony G. Macintyre, MD, Greg Shaw, DSc,
Valerie Seefried, MPH, Lissa Westerman, RN, Sergio de Cosmo, MS
Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management
The George Washington University
October 11, 2007
Introduction
In December 2004, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Emergency Management
Strategic Healthcare Group awarded the Institute for Crisis Disaster & Risk Management
(ICDRM) a contract to participate in establishing innovative training and personal
development curricula for the VHA Emergency Management Academy (VHA-EMA).
The objective of the project was to develop a nationally peer-reviewed, National Incident
Management System (NIMS) compliant, competency-based instructional outline and
curriculum content upon which to base education and training courses. The curriculum is
intended to educate VHA personnel for response and recovery in healthcare emergencies
and disasters, to provide a resource for future VHA training programs, and to be placed in
the public domain for use by other healthcare personnel.
The initial phase of the EMA project consisted of developing a competency framework
(competency definition, structure and format, and critical elements) followed by
development of peer-reviewed emergency response and recovery competencies for VHAselected healthcare system job groups. The competencies describe knowledge, skills, and
abilities essential for adequate job performance during the emergency response and
recovery phases of an incident. Peer review was accomplished through a web-based
survey of the proposed competencies, which was distributed to a select, nationwide
sampling of emergency management personnel who were identified as having extensive
experience or advanced expertise in healthcare emergency response. The survey process
was designed to obtain a balanced expert opinion as to whether the project team’s written
competencies were valid, and to assess the appropriate level of proficiency for each
primary competency (i.e., awareness, operations, or expert). The competencies developed
during this initial phase were then used to guide the development of learning objectives
for the instructional curriculum.
1
This report was supported by Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration contract
“Emergency Management Academy Development,” CCN20350A. The report is the work of the authors
and does not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or any of its employees.
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
33
Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
An extensive research effort was conducted to understand the historical use of
competencies, and to establish objective criteria for competency development.
Historical development of competencies
Competency modeling originated in business management research, and has evolved
extensively over the past 25 years as other disciplines began adopting the practice. 2 The
original intent of competency development was to enhance the then common “job
analysis” by relating a position’s requisite knowledge, skills and abilities to the overall
objectives of the organization in which the position existed. This approach aligns the
objectives (i.e., desired outputs) of individual jobs with the overall objectives of the
organization, such that organizational objectives are achieved through effective
individual job performance. While this was the original intent of competencies, their
definition varied widely as time progressed. Competency definitions range from
emphasizing underlying characteristics of an employee (e.g., a motive, trait, skill, aspects
of one’s self-image, social role, or a body of knowledge) that produce effective and/or
superior performance 3 to performance characteristics (i.e., how an employee conducted
their job in relation to the organization’s objectives). 4
The application of competencies across the many organizations that use them has also
varied widely. The private sector has commonly employed competencies to define
“superior performers” 5 and therefore, as a selection tool for hiring, promotion, and/or
salary enhancement. In other organizations, competencies have been used for job-specific
performance feedback and improvement. Still others have used competencies to guide
future program training and development. Because of this variation in definition and
application, it becomes critically important to address these vagaries at the outset of any
competency development project. This concept was well-described by one competency
research team:
“The first step in the implementation of any competency-based management
framework must be the organizational consensus on how to define ‘competency.’
This agreed upon definition will drive the methodology used to identify and
assess the competencies within the organization.” 6
The GWU-ICDRM project team strongly agreed with this concept, and started the project
by defining how the competencies within this initiative would be applied:
2
Newsome, Shaun, Victor M Catano, and Arla L. Day. Leader Competencies: Proposing a Research
Framework. 2003. available at http://www.cleleadership.ca/paper/leader_competenciesproposing_a_research_framework.pdf
3
Boyatzis, Richard. The Competent Manager: A Model for Effective Performance New York: Wiley, 1982.
4
US Office of Personnel Management. Executive Core Qualifications (ECQ’s), accessed at
http://www.opm.gov/ses/ecq.asp
5
Klein AL. Validity and Reliability for Competency-based Systems: Reducing Litigation Risks.
Compensation Benefits and Review, 28, 31-37, 1996. cited in “Newsome, Shaun, Victor M Catano, and
Arla L. Day. Leader Competencies: Proposing a Research Framework. 2003.
6
Newsome, Shaun, Victor M Catano, and Arla L. Day. Leader Competencies: Proposing a Research
Framework. 2003. available at http://www.cleleadership.ca/paper/leader_competenciesproposing_a_research_framework.pdf
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
34
Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
The project competencies are intended to serve as formative tools to guide
healthcare system personnel in developing knowledge, skills and abilities for
effective performance during emergency response and recovery. These
competencies are also intended to serve as a guide for developing preparedness
education and training, and therefore, to serve as a basis for the healthcare
emergency management curriculum. Finally, the competencies may be employed
as a tool for assessing the performance of individual healthcare personnel
performance during emergency response and recovery operations.
Defining a competency framework
Despite an extensive search of published articles related to competencies, the GWUICDRM project team determined that no single authoritative source presented a
consistent competency definition and competency framework to adequately support the
VHA-EMA project needs. A framework was therefore developed, analyzed through pilot
competency development, refined and completed before establishing the individual
emergency response and recovery competencies for this project. The competency
framework was therefore used to impose a strict methodological consistency when
developing and defining all competencies developed in this program. Central to this
framework is the critical importance of competencies being objective and measurable,
internally and externally consistent, and tightly described within the context of the
organization’s specific objectives.
Within this framework, the project team defined a “competency” as a specific knowledge
element, skill, and/or ability that is objective and measurable (i.e., demonstrable) on the
job. It is required for effective performance within the context of a job’s responsibilities,
and leads to achieving the objectives of the organization. Competencies are ideally
qualified by an accompanying proficiency level. 7
The GWU-ICDRM project team recognized the need to adapt the methods for
competency development, since the usual business approach to establishing competencies
is problematic for emergency management. Business management models establish
competencies by observing performance and relating it to individual and organizational
outputs. Because emergencies are rare events, and therefore emergency response and
recovery outputs occur very infrequently, the related competency framework and
definitions for this project are based less upon observed outputs. Instead, the basis is a
healthcare system’s emergency response and recovery objectives, together with the
NIMS-consistent incident command system 8 structure and processes mandated for use by
all emergency response organizations in the U.S. 9,10
7
GWU Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management. Emergency Management Glossary of Terms
(October 2007) available at www.gwu.edu/~icdrm/
8
Fedral Emergency Management Agency. National Incident Management System (NIMS) (March 1, 2004),
available at: http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nims/index.shtm.
9
Bush GW. Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) -5: Management of Domestic Incidents
(February 28, 2003) accessed at http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2003/02/20030228-9.html
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The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Response competencies in systems using the Incident Command System (ICS), therefore,
should be based upon the general incident objectives an organization has during incident
response, and upon the organizational structures, processes, and relationships with other
organizations that are used during response rather than those used during everyday
experience. Emergency competencies are commonly developed without this relationship
to a defined response system, 11 making it difficult to define how scientific or medical
knowledge is to be implemented in an emergency response. In contrast, the GWUICDRM project team specifically incorporated the NIMS mandate to use ICS by
including reference to the NIMS/Incident Command System structure and processes
throughout the project’s emergency response and recovery project competencies.
Because of the anticipated large number of competencies, the project team also
established a “primary versus supporting competency” hierarchy to categorize the
individual competencies as they were developed. Designating “primary” and
“supporting” competencies helps to maintain a priority in the framework when listing a
large number of individual competencies. Supporting competencies are also a means to
more fully define and clarify the primary competencies.
Preparedness versus response and recovery competencies
Published articles describing emergency management competencies commonly do not
differentiate between preparedness and response competencies, and list them in an
intermixed fashion. 12,13 The GWU-ICDRM project team sought to maintain a separation
between these categories.
Preparedness competencies are commonly based upon everyday organizational
objectives, structure, processes, and relationships to other organizations. Preparedness is
unquestionably important, but for it to be accurate, comprehensive and successful in
establishing an effective emergency response capability, a thorough understanding of the
response system must be established first, and preparedness guided by this. It was
therefore reasoned by the project team that specific competencies for emergency response
should be established and validated first, and then used as the “end state” to guide the
development of valid preparedness competencies.
10
Barbera JA, Macintyre AG, et al. Emergency Management Principles and Practices for Healthcare
Systems, Unit 3, Lesson 3.1.1, accessed at http://www1.va.gov/emshg/page.cfm?pg=122
11
ATPM (Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine) in collaboration with Center for Health policy,
Columbia University School of Nursing. Emergency Response Clinician Competencies in Initial
Assessment and Management, 2003, accessed at http://www.atpm.org/education/Clinical_Compt.html
12
INCMCE (International Nursing Coalition for Mass Casualty Education). Educational Competencies for
Registered Nurses Responding to Mass Casualty Incidents, 2003. Available at:
http://www.nursing.hs.columbia.edu/institutes-centers/chphsr/hospcomps.pdf
13
ACEP (American College of Emergency Physicians) and the U.S Department of Health & Human
Services, Office of Emergency Preparedness. Developing Objectives, Content, and Competencies for the
Training of Emergency Medical Technicians, Emergency Physicians, and Emergency Nurses to Care for
Casualties Resulting From Nuclear, Biological, or Chemical (NBC) Incidents, Final Report April 23, 2001.
American College of Emergency Physicians, Irving, Texas.
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
36
Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Because of these considerations, the initial project focus was response and recovery
competencies. Emergency management program competencies related to mitigation and
preparedness were developed later for the two job groups that are the initial focus of the
certification project.
Establishing appropriate levels of proficiency
Concurring with other authors that “competency” is not an all-or-none phenomenon, the
GWU-ICDRM project team established “proficiency levels” to address this issue in a
graduated fashion. Proficiency levels delineate the “The degree of understanding of the
subject matter and its practical application through training and performance…” 14 In
emergency management, proficiency indicates the level of mastery of knowledge, skills
and abilities (i.e., competencies) that are demonstrable on the job and lead to the
organization achieving its objectives. Levels of proficiency may therefore also be used to
describe the level of mastery that is the objective of and specific training or education
program. The final proficiency levels defined for this project are presented in Table 1.
Table 1. Definition of the Levels of Proficiency
Represents an understanding of the knowledge/skills/abilities
Awareness encompassed by the competency, but not to a level of capability to
adequately perform the competency actions within the organization’s
system.
Operations
Expert
Represents the knowledge/skills/abilities to safely and effectively
perform the assigned tasks and activities, including equipment use as
necessary
Represents operations-level proficiency plus the additional
knowledge/skills/abilities to apply expert judgment to solve problems
and make complex decisions.
As core and job group competencies were developed, the project team qualified each
primary competency with an indicated level of proficiency (awareness, operations,
expert).
14
EMA. Urban Search & Rescue Incident Support Team Training: Student Manual. Module 1, Unit 4,
Page 6: Planning Process Overview. n/a:40. 4/16/2004, accessed at:
http://www.fema.gov/emergency/usr/usrist2.shtm
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The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Developing emergency response and recovery competencies
Using the competency framework established in this project, response and recovery
“core” competencies were developed for all personnel within a healthcare system that
may have a role in the emergency response, regardless of their specific emergency
response and recovery function. Additional competencies were then established for three
functionally based job groups within a healthcare. The original designation for these job
groups were (1) healthcare facility leaders, (2) patient care providers, and (3) emergency
management program managers. The titles and definitions evolved with outside input as
the project tasks were accomplished (see Table 2 for final titles and descriptions).
Initial competency identification and development was accomplished through an analysis
of ICS as presented in NIMS, an extensive literature review, and an evaluation of the
VHA system and processes for emergency response. 15 Additionally, the GWU-ICDRM
project team relied upon their extensive emergency management and disaster response
experience, and upon related previous research efforts. 16,17,18
The emergency response and recovery competencies for the initially designated three job
groups were then fully developed, studied through a web-based survey, revised based
upon input and completed. 19
Identification of additional job groups and their associated competencies
Early in the competency development process, it became apparent that there were
additional important healthcare emergency management job groups beyond the three that
were initially described.
These groups have distinct response and recovery
responsibilities (and therefore associated competencies) for the healthcare organization’s
resiliency and medical surge. After extensive research during the latest phase of the
project, the additional groups were identified as: Facilities and Engineering Services
(FES), Police and Security Services (PSS), and Clinical Support Services (CSS). Their
descriptions are presented in Table 2. Using the previously defined methodology
(including web-based peer review), the follow-on project allowed for the development of
emergency response and recovery competencies for these remaining job groups.
15
Veterans Health Administration. VHA Emergency Management Program Guidebook, 2005, accessed at:
http://www1.va.gov/emshg/page.cfm?pg=114
16
Barbera, Joseph A and Anthony G. Macintyre. Medical and Health Incident Management System: A
Comprehensive Functional Description for Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management.
Institute for Crisis, Disaster & Risk Management. The George Washington University, Washington DC,
October 2002, accessed at www.gwu.edu/~icdrm/
17
Barbera, Joseph A and Anthony G. Macintyre. Mass Casualty Handbook: Hospital Emergency
Preparedness and Response, First Edition. Jane’s Information Group, 2003.
18
CNA Corporation. Medical Surge Capacity & Capability: The Management System for Integrating
Medical and Health Resources During large-Scale Emergencies. August 2004, accessed at:
http://www.hhs.gov/ophep/mscc_handbook.html
19
Barbera JA, Macintyre AG, et al. VHA-EMA Emergency Response and Recovery Competencies:
Competency Survey, Analysis, and Report (June 16, 2005), available at www.gwu.edu/~icdrm/
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The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Development of preparedness and mitigation (program) competencies for
Emergency Management Program Managers and Healthcare System Leaders
The methodology utilized in this project focused first on the development and validation
of response and recovery competencies as an “end state” for healthcare system personnel
in their emergency management activities. The second phase of the project allowed for
the development of program competencies for Emergency Program Managers and
Healthcare System Leaders, which focused upon preparedness and mitigation activities
necessary to reach this “end state.” These two job groups maintain primary responsibility
for the emergency management program within a healthcare system, and thus have
extensive primary competencies that relate to program development and maintenance
required for successful response to emergencies and disasters.
The program competencies were developed using the earlier methods, with identical
criteria that the competencies be objective and measurable, maintain internal and external
consistency, and be described within the context of an organization’s specific emergency
management program objectives. Program competencies may more closely align with
business management models during day-to-to day operations. Hence, organizational and
individual outputs for these groups can be expected to be more frequent. This concept
was included in the development of the program competencies.
While no formal survey was conducted following the development of these program
competencies, peer review was accomplished by providing draft competencies to experts
for comment. Only minor changes resulted.
The final job group titles and their descriptions are listed below. The competencies
follow.
Table 2. Healthcare System Job Group Definitions
All Personnel
(AP)
All personnel are defined as any healthcare system administrator,
employee, professional staff, licensed independent practitioners or
others with a specified role in the healthcare systems emergency
operations plan (EOP).
Patient Care
Providers
(PCP)
Physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, licensed practical
nurses, nurses working within expanded roles (CRNA, RNP, and
others), emergency medical technicians, paramedics, and respiratory
therapists and others who provide direct clinical patient care. Not
included are clinical support staff that provide patient care services
under the direct supervision of patient care providers: e.g., nurse’s
aides, procedure technicians, orderlies, and others.
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Hospital and/or healthcare system-wide senior executives (CEO,
COO, CFO), hospital-wide managers, department heads, nursing
executives, chief of the medical staff, and/or senior managers in
Healthcare
System Leaders large departments or key operating units. It is assumed that
members of this job group, due to their everyday organizational
(HSL)
positions, would be assigned to serve in the command and general
staff positions of an ICS structure during a healthcare system’s
emergency response.
Emergency
Management
Program
Managers
(EPM)
Personnel primarily responsible for developing, implementing and
maintaining healthcare facility and system-wide emergency
management (EM) programs that include the Emergency Operations
Plan (EOP). System level emergency program managers, above the
level of individual facilities, (such as VHA Area Emergency
Managers or program managers at the level of the VA Emergency
Management Strategic Healthcare Group) are also included in this
job group. It is assumed that the individuals in this job group will
be assigned to a command & general staff ICS position (usually
planning section chief) during response, and so are expected to
possess the response and recovery competencies listed under
Healthcare System Leaders as well. In some healthcare systems, an
EM Program Manager may oversee a more limited position (e.g.
program coordinator) with a narrower range of competencies.
Clinical
Support
Services
(CSS)
Personnel that perform tasks related to the medical care of patients
without direct patient interface (e.g. pharmacists, lab technicians,
etc.) or provide patient services that aren’t primarily medical care
(social services, physical and occupational therapy, pastoral care,
patient educators, and others) or provide patient care services under
the direct supervision of patient care providers (such as nurse’s
aides, procedure technicians, orderlies, transporters).
Police &
Security
Services
(PSS)
Personnel whose day to day job in the healthcare system involves
security and the full range of law enforcement activities. Day-today duties may or may not put these individuals into direct contact
with patients.
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Facilities and
Engineering
Services
(FES)
Personnel whose day to day job involves maintaining the physical
plant and its various systems. Included in this group are facilities
and physical plant personnel, engineers, grounds personnel,
biomedical engineers, food services, communications and IT
personnel. It also usually includes administrative safety positions
below the level of the healthcare system leaders. Day to day duties
rarely put these personnel in direct patient contact.
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Emergency Response and Recovery Competencies
All Personnel (AP)
All personnel are defined as any healthcare system administrator, employee, professional
staff, licensed independent practitioners or others with a specified role in the healthcare
systems emergency operations plan (EOP).
x
AP-R1: Utilize general Incident Command System (ICS) principles during
incident response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R1.1: Describe ICS as an emergency response and recovery operating
system and its application to healthcare system incident response and
recovery, management structure, concept of operations, and planning
cycle.
o AP-R1.2: Describe your potential role(s) and responsibilities within the
healthcare system response and recovery in terms of ICS principles.
o AP-R1.3: Describe the ICS-delineated expectations of individual
responders in relation to the healthcare system response and recovery to
include: attendance at briefings, reporting requirements, and use of rolerelated documents such as Operational Checklists (Job Action Sheets).
Skills
o AP-R1.4: Demonstrate an operations level of proficiency in ICS principles
by utilizing appropriate forms, attending indicated meetings, and adhering
to appropriate reporting requirements.
x
AP-R2: Recognize situations that suggest indications for full or partial
activation of the healthcare system’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), and
report them appropriately and promptly.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R2.1: Describe the general characteristics of emergency situations that
may indicate the need for full or partial EOP activation.
o AP-R2.2: Describe the reporting requirements and methodology for
situations that may require full or partial EOP activation.
Skills
o AP-R2.3: Identify situations within your areas of regular duty that should
be reported for consideration for full or partial activation of the healthcare
system’s EOP.
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o AP-R2.4: Report situations within your areas of regular duty by following
EOP notification procedures and contacting the appropriate person as
indicated by your specific role and by the situation at hand (e.g., page
operator, supervisor, etc.).
x
AP-R3: Participate in healthcare system mobilization to rapidly transition
from day-to-day operations to incident response organization and processes
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R3.1: Describe the procedures necessary to receive notification of
EOP activation and to prepare your work area, as indicated, for EOP
response and recovery.
o AP-R3.2: Describe the initial reporting requirements for your expected
role or position.
o AP-R3.3: Describe the location and format of the system EOP.
Skills
o AP-R3.4: Follow your functional areas mobilization plan as outlined in the
EOP to prepare your work area for EOP response and recovery.
o AP-R3.5: Confirm notification receipt and report to the appropriate EOP
position your initial situation, resource status, and any special problems
encountered for your specific role or functional area.
o AP-R3.6: Locate the facility EOP and access portions applicable to your
role and responsibilities.
x
AP-R4: Apply the healthcare system’s core mission statement to your actions
during emergency response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R4.1: Describe how your emergency operations role and
responsibilities support the healthcare system mission during emergency
response and recovery.
Skills
o AP-R4.2: Demonstrate your understanding of the healthcare system’s
mission during emergency response and recovery by ensuring your actions
continually contribute to 1) continuity of patient care operations, 2) the
safety of patients, families, and staff, 3) the conservation of property, and
4) the healthcare system support to the community to ensure the nation’s
safety.
x
AP-R5: Apply the healthcare system code of ethics to your actions during
emergency operations.
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Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R5.1: Describe how the healthcare system’s and other codes of ethics
(such as Federal codes of ethics for Federal facilities), as applicable, apply
to your role and responsibilities during emergency response and recovery.
Skills
o AP-R5.2: Demonstrate your understanding of the healthcare system’s and
Federal codes (as applicable) of ethics by applying them to your individual
response actions during emergency response and recovery.
x AP-R6: Execute your personal/family preparedness plans to maximize your
availability to participate in the healthcare system’s emergency response and
recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o AP-R6.1: Describe the importance of both a personal and a family
preparedness plan to allow you to perform your healthcare system
emergency response and recovery role.
o AP-R6.2: Describe your responsibility as an employee to maintain a
personal and family preparedness plan.
o AP-R6.3: Describe your responsibility as a supervisor (if applicable) to
promote employee maintenance of a personal and family preparedness
plan.
o AP-R6-4: Identify the personal/family specific requirements and details
that must be addressed in your personal/family preparedness plan that
allow you to perform your healthcare system response role in a potentially
changed work schedule and environment.
Skills
o AP-R6.5: Demonstrate your availability to work in your assigned role
during healthcare system response and recovery by executing your
personal/family preparedness plan.
o AP-R6.6: Demonstrate an expert level of proficiency in personal and
family preparedness planning by executing your personal/family
preparedness plan and meeting your personal and family needs across any
circumstances.
x
AP-R7: Respond with your previously prepared and maintained personal
“go-kit” to maximize your ability to perform your assigned role during
healthcare system response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
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o AP-R7.1: Describe the importance of your personal “go kit” for selfprotection and to allow you to perform your healthcare system response
and recovery role and responsibilities (A “go kit” contains personal
supplies that an employee would need to work their emergency response
and recovery role beyond a usual work shift, potentially not returning
home for 72 hours).
o AP-R7.2: Describe your responsibility as an employee to maintain a
personal “go-kit.”
o AP-R7.3: Describe your responsibility (if applicable) as a supervisor to
promote employee maintenance of a personal “go kit.”
o AP-R7.4: Describe how the EOP components and related policies and
procedures, (evacuation, shelter in place, lock down, etc.) of the healthcare
system Emergency Operations Plans impact your decisions on what should
be included in your personal “go kit.”
o AP-R7.5: Identify your personal situation (physical ability/constraints,
medical needs, personal/family preparedness plan, etc.) and how it impacts
on your decisions on what should be included in your personal “go kit.”
Skills
o APC-7.6: Demonstrate your availability to work in your assigned role and
operational periods during response and recovery through the use of your
personal “go kit.”
x
AP-R8: Follow the general response procedures for all personnel in the
Occupant Emergency Procedures (OEP) and assist others (healthcare system
personnel, patients, and visitors) as necessary to accomplish the OEP
directives. [Footnote: More specific response procedures are addressed under
respective job groups.]
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R8.1: Describe the component parts of the OEP and your
responsibilities and actions under each.
o AP-R8.2: Describe circumstances that could lead to OEP activation and
your responsibilities during OEP activation.
o AP-R8.3: Describe the reporting procedures for your job position that
would activate the OEP.
Skills
o AP-R8.4: Execute your roles and responsibilities for the facility OEP by
conducting the OEP directives for your job position in evacuation, shelter
in place, or other actions during emergency operations.
x
AP-R9: Perform your specific roles and responsibilities as assigned in the
healthcare system’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and the appropriate
Incident Action Plan (IAP) in order to support the system’s objectives.
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Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R9.1: Describe the ICS framework as applied specifically to the
healthcare system emergency response and recovery.
o AP-R9.2: Describe your role and responsibility as assigned in the
healthcare system’s EOP.
o AP-R9.3: Describe how potential changes in event parameters may
necessitate changes in the facility IAP objectives and strategies, and hence
changes in your job area’s tactics and assignments (Management by
objectives).
o AE-R9.4: Describe the urgent issues that could potentially require a
change in your job or job area’s response strategies and tactics.
o AP-R9.5: Describe your personal accountability requirements during
emergency response and recovery.
o AP-R9.6: Describe the equipment and technologies for your specific role
and responsibilities within the healthcare facility EOP.
o AP-R9.7: Describe the facility policy applicable to your role for engaging
the media.
Skills
o AP-R9.8: Demonstrate appropriate EOP-designated reactive actions in
response to potential/actual events that have activated the EOP.
o AP-R9.9: Demonstrate your specific role and responsibilities as assigned
in the healthcare facility’s EOP by following your operational checklist
(job action sheet), completing assignments, filling out appropriate forms,
and fulfilling reporting requirements.
o AP-R9.10: Ensure organizational objectives are met by formulating and/or
implementing specific tactics consistent with the objectives and strategies
delineated in the controlling IAP for the current operational period.
o AP-R9.11: Report data to supervisors, as indicated, to contribute to
measuring effectiveness of your EOP functional area and its contributions
to achieving the organization’s designated incident objectives.
o AP-R9.12: Operate all equipment and technologies for your specific role
and responsibilities within the healthcare system’s EOP.
x
AP-R10: Follow the Communication Plan and reporting requirements as
outlined in the healthcare system’s EOP and the specific Incident Action
Plan for an emergency event.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R10.1: Describe the policy and methods for communication and
reporting during emergency response and recovery.
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o AP-R10.2: Describe the process for rapidly communicating urgent issues
that could require a change in response strategies or tactics for your job
area, and the appropriate party to receive your communication.
o AP-R10.3: Describe the process for reporting significant hazard or
response impacts that you or your job area encounter to the appropriate
party as indicated by the EOP.
o AP-R10.4: Describe the general content of the communication plan
component of the Incident Action Plan as it relates to your emergency
response and recovery role.
o AP-R10.5: Describe the procedures applicable to your role for interaction
with the media.
Skills
o AP-R10.6: Demonstrate the reporting requirements within your functional
area as delineated in the healthcare system EOP.
o AP-R10.7: Maintain communications with appropriate parties for your
role/functional area despite changing requirements and event parameters.
o AP-R10.8: Demonstrate an understanding of media interactions by
referring requests to appropriate personnel (as applicable), and when
interacting with the media, follow designated interview procedures and
protocols.
x
AP-R11: Follow and enforce healthcare system’s safety rules, regulations,
and policies during emergency response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R11.1: Describe the healthcare system’s safety rules, regulations, and
policies during emergency response and recovery that maintain personal
safety and a safe work environment.
o AP-R11.2: Describe how to apply the Safety Plan component of the
facility Incident Action Plan.
o AP-R11.3: Describe the safety specific actions and procedures to be
followed when unsafe situations/events are encountered.
o AP-R11.4: Describe incident parameters that may serve as stressors for
response personnel, how stress may be manifested, and appropriate
interventions for your specific role.
Skills
o AP-R11.5: Demonstrate your adherence to and enforcement of healthcare
system safety rules, regulations, and policies during emergency response
and recovery by wearing appropriate PPE, following pre-defined safety
procedures, identifying and addressing unsafe practices, and following the
IAP Safety Plan as briefed by your immediate supervisor.
o AP-R11.6: Recognize and address incident stress for yourself and others in
your functional area by identifying manifestations of stress and, in a
fashion appropriate to your specific role, decreasing the stressors, limiting
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the negative impact of the stressors, or ensuring appropriate assistance in
recovering from negative stressors.
x
AP-R12: Follow and enforce police and security measures consistent with the
nature of the incident that has prompted the EOP activation.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R12.1: Describe healthcare system security rules, regulations, and
policies that apply to your assigned role and responsibilities in the EOP.
o AP-R12.2: Describe the security specific actions and procedures to be
followed when a suspicious event or security breach is detected.
Skills
o AP-R12.3: Demonstrate your adherence to and enforcement of security
measures during emergency response and recovery by following security
briefings, instruction from individual security personnel, and badge
procedures.
x
AP-R13: Utilize or request (as appropriate) and integrate equipment,
supplies, and personnel for your specific role or functional area during
emergency response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R13.1: Describe procedures for requesting equipment, supplies, and
personnel for your functional area and the integration of these resources
during emergency response and recovery.
Skills
o AP-R13.2: Demonstrate your ability to request and integrate additional
resources by following EOP procedures outlined for these activities.
o AP-R13.3: Demonstrate the ability to assess the adequacy of equipment,
supplies and personnel to carry out your job assignments during each
operational period.
x
AP-R14: Follow demobilization procedures that facilitate rapid and efficient
incident disengagement and out-processing of individual resources and/or the
overall healthcare organization.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R14.1: Describe demobilization policies and procedures for your work
area, including procedures to “catch up” on regular staffing and other
activities that were suspended or revised during emergency operations.
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o AP-R14.2: Describe the policy and procedures for out-processing of
personnel during demobilization.
o AP-R14.3: Describe the policy and procedures for conducting an initial
Incident Review (commonly known as a “hot wash”) for your work area.
o AP-R14.4: Describe the policy and procedures for documenting and
reporting incident-related issues for inclusion in After Action Report
process, analysis, and corrective measures.
Skills
o AP-R14.5: Demonstrate demobilization procedures for the incident by
following the demobilization plan specific to your functional area.
o AP-R14.6: Prioritize, initiate or participate in delayed activities (relevant
to your position) that were suspended or revised during emergency
response.
o AP-R14.7: Participate in out-processing, to include a performance
evaluation and any indicated physical exam.
o AP-R14.8: Provide input into the Incident Review as appropriate for your
position during emergency response.
x
AP-R15: Follow recovery procedures that ensure facility return to baseline
activity.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o AP-R15.1: Describe policies and procedures for rehabilitation of
personnel.
o AP-R15.2: Describe policies and procedures for rehabilitation of
equipment (including recertification for use), reordering of supplies
specific to your functional area, and rehabilitating your workspace.
o AP-R15.3: Describe policies and procedures specific to your role and
responsibilities for rehabilitation of the facility.
o AP-R15.4: Describe the policies and procedures for a formal After-Action
Report.
Skills
o AP-R15.5: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of personnel
rehabilitation activities by participating in personnel rehabilitation as
instructed.
o AP-R15.6: Demonstrate an understanding of facility and equipment
rehabilitation by participating in these procedures to ensure your
functional area readiness for day-to-day activities and future EOP
activations.
o AP-R15.7: Demonstrate an understanding of After Action-Reports by
submitting items in the required format.
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Emergency Management Program Manager (EPM)
Personnel primarily responsible for developing, implementing and maintaining healthcare
facility and system-wide emergency management (EM) programs that include the
Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). System level emergency program managers, above
the level of individual facilities, (such as VHA Area Emergency Managers or program
managers at the level of the VA Emergency Management Strategic Healthcare Group) are
also included in this job group. It is assumed that the individuals in this job group will
be assigned to a command & general staff ICS position (usually planning section
chief) during response, and so are expected to possess the response and recovery
competencies listed under Healthcare System Leaders as well. 20
x
EPM-R1: Recognize circumstances and/or actions, across the program
manager’s jurisdiction if appropriate, that indicate a potential incident and
report the situation to facility leadership and appropriate authorities.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o EPM-R1.1: Describe the conditions across representative hazard types that
indicate a potential incident requiring healthcare system response and
recovery capabilities.
o EPM-R1.2: List the healthcare system leadership positions that should be
notified in the event of a potential incident and describe the formal
notification process.
o EPM-R1.3: List the outside authorities and resources that can be queried
to rapidly obtain information about an evolving event, and describe the
communication methods for this purpose.
Skills
o EPM-R1.4: Identify and obtain information from all non-healthcare
system sources that could indicate the occurrence of an incident and need
for healthcare system response.
o EPM-R1.5: Report the circumstances of the potential incident to the
relevant facility leader(s) and notify outside authorities as appropriate.
x
EPM-R2: Provide assistance and guidance to healthcare system Incident
Managers, and other authorities as requested, on the decision to fully or
partially activate Emergency Operations Plans (EOP).
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
20
In some healthcare systems, an EM Program Manager may oversee a more limited position (e.g. program
coordinator) with a narrower range of competencies.
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o EPM-R2.1: Describe the criteria that indicate the need for a partial or full
healthcare system EOP activation.
o EPM-R2.2: Describe the impact of EOP activation (full or partial) upon
day-to-day facility operations.
o EPM-R2.3: Describe the process for healthcare system EOP activation.
Skills
o EPM-R2.4: Assist facility leaders with the decision to activate emergency
medical response plans and procedures by communicating relevant
information about the nature and consequences of an incident and by
explaining the benefits of activating the EOP.
o EPM-R2.5: Provide Incident Managers with a list of all facility personnel
positions with the authority to activate the EOP, as requested, and outline
the methods for activation.
x
EPM-R3: Assist in the rapid mobilization of activated healthcare systems to
transition from day-to-day activities to response and recovery operations.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o EPM-R3.1: Describe processes and procedures used to mobilize the
healthcare system and/or its individual facilities for emergency response
and recovery.
o EPM-R3.2: List all the external agencies relevant to your position that
should be notified of the healthcare system’s EOP activation and determine
their level of response.
o EPM-R3.3: List all the internal healthcare system resources and facilities
(ICP/EOC and others) that must be mobilized as the EOP is activated.
Skills
o EPM-R3.4: As requested by facility or healthcare system leadership, assist
in facility mobilization by ensuring appropriate external liaisons are
established and ensuring the facility management structure for response is
clearly communicated externally.
o EPM-R3.5: Provide the Healthcare System Incident Manager with
briefings on the mobilization status of healthcare system facilities and/or
internal resources (such as the EOC or the Decontamination Area) as
indicated by the type and scope of the incident activation.
x
EPM-R4: Ensure full and proper execution of the appropriate emergency
operations plan (EOP) for your healthcare system or designated healthcare
system facilities during emergency response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
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o EPM-R4.1: Describe the facility-specific as well as the larger, overarching
healthcare system incident management organizational structure and
response roles of all functional areas and key positions and how the
incident management team (IMT) functions in parallel with continued
enterprise management and operations..
o EPM-R4.2: Describe the healthcare enterprise’s organizational
requirements as well as the relevant laws, regulations, policies and
precedents that affect emergency operations and principles of emergency
management.
Skills
o EPM-R4.3: Provide the healthcare system Incident Command Post with an
initial projection of the supplies and resources needed for response and
recovery as requested and as appropriate.
o EPM-R4.4: At the outset of the incident, provide a briefing to the
healthcare system incident manager on the response actions undertaken by
external incident response agencies, or assure this is accomplished by the
healthcare system senior liaison.
o EPM-R4.5: Verify that the healthcare system’s personnel have adopted
incident management roles and responsibilities according to the response
structure and functional roles delineated in the relevant EOPs.
o EPM-R4.6: Verify compliance of EOP response actions with applicable
rules and regulations, and advise the facility Incident Commander as
indicated.
o EPM-R4.7: Provide assistance by monitoring the emergency response
system assessing the adequacy and effectiveness of the incident
management system in place at activated facilities within the healthcare
system, as appropriate for the Program Manager’s jurisdiction.
o EPM-R4.8: Address any apparent deficiencies noted in the incident
management system during response and recovery by notifying the
Incident Commander of the facility within the healthcare system and
recommending solutions.
x
EPM-R5: Demonstrate the ability to function as a healthcare system’s Plans
Chief within the ICS structure as indicated by the Emergency Operations
Plan (EOP).
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o EPM-R5.1: Describe the healthcare system response roles and
responsibilities ascribed to the chief of the Planning Section in the EOP.
o EPM-R5.2: Describe the facility Incident Planning Cycle and the key
components for which the Plans Chief is responsible.
o EPM-R5.3: Describe the methods for functional area reporting and for the
collation, processing, and dissemination of this information.
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o EPM-R5.4: Describe methods for monitoring response and recovery
actions in order to assist the Incident Commander in determining progress
towards achieving the incident objectives.
Skills
o EPM-R5.5: Establish an effective Incident Planning Cycle by defining
operational periods (approved by the system Incident Commander),
coordinating the Planning Cycle timing with non-healthcare system
response agencies, and disseminating the schedule for essential planning
activities (management and planning meetings, operational briefings, and
others).
o EPM-R5.6: Ensure adequate functional area reporting by establishing the
time schedule for reporting and verifying reports are received, to include
situation, resource status, specific tactics utilized, progress accomplished,
and unusual problems encountered; include patient tracking as necessary.
o EPM-R5.7: Include information originating internal and external to the
system in the planning process by monitoring internal and external sources
for information, including the level of response by external organizations,
and considering the information in the planning process.
o EPM-R5.8: Ensure awareness of event parameters within the healthcare
system by providing continual updates to the leader of functional areas and
external agencies as appropriate.
o EPM-R5.9: Provide rapid contingency response by monitoring for sudden
changes in event parameters that necessitate revision of response strategies
and tactics, and disseminate appropriate notification to relevant internal
and external parties.
o EPM-R5.10: Manage orderly and concise planning activities (management
and planning meetings, operational briefings) by limiting distractions,
providing agendas, and ensuring documentation of all relevant information
discussed in the meetings.
x
EPM-R6: Perform or assist with the senior healthcare system liaison function
and ensure that relevant response and recovery information is exchanged
with senior healthcare system management levels beyond the immediate
agency executive, if indicated.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o EPM-R6.1: Describe the purpose and structure of the enterprise’s
overarching healthcare system administrative hierarchy (such as the
Veterans Integrated Service Network and Headquarters for the VHA) and
its potential role during facility emergency response and recovery.
o EPM-R6.2: Describe essential components of facility planning that should
be disseminated to senior healthcare system management levels.
o EPM-R6.3: Describe any assigned healthcare enterprise responsibilities to
the community, State, or Federal governments or other entities established
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through contracts, statutes or other authorities (for example, the VHADoD Contingency Plan) where the healthcare organization should
establish a formal liaison function.
Skills
o EPM-R6.4: If part of a larger healthcare system (such as a VA Medical
Center within a Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN)), fulfill the
region-wide emergency operations (response) plan and liaison function if
it is activated.
o EPM-R6.5: Ensure that senior healthcare system officials are receiving
accurate information from the facility (usually through the facility’s
agency executive) by providing the current facility IAP and/or situation
reports in formats that are understandable to them.
o EPM-R6.6: Ensure that the facility Agency Executive and Incident
Manager receive appropriate communications from senior healthcare
system officials above the level of the incident management structure.
o EPM-R6.7: Assure that established responsibilities to the community,
State, or Federal governments or other entities addressed and required
actions communicated to appropriate Agency Executives and Incident
Management Teams.
x
EPM-R7: If Program Manager of a larger healthcare system (such as a VA
Medical Center within a Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN)) with
activated IMTs within individual healthcare facilities within your network,
establish senior liaison with appropriate external healthcare organizations
within the healthcare system in your area, conduct information exchange,
and coordinate incident response strategies and tactics.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o EPM-R7.1: List relevant external healthcare organizations that exist within
the emergency response network in your area and methods for contacting
them.
o EPM-R7.2: Describe how the emergency response and recovery actions of
healthcare facilities within your network and in your area impact one
another.
o EPM-R7.3: Describe how healthcare facilities within your network and
external agencies in the same impact area may support one another during
emergency response and recovery.
Skills
o EPM-R7.4: Ensure the IMT contact information for activated IMTs in
your network is disseminated to appropriate external emergency response
agencies.
o EPM-R7.5: Facilitate the process for healthcare facilities within your
network to gain access to appropriate external emergency response
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agencies by establishing liaison or providing contact methods (as
indicated).
o EPM-R7.6: Facilitate coordination of response strategies and tactics by
ensuring regular exchange of Incident Action Plans (or summaries
contained in Situation Reports) between IMTs in your network and the
appropriate external emergency response agencies.
EPM-R7.7: Facilitate the use of mutual aid agreements between facilities
within your network, and with external organizations when indicated.
x
EPM-R8: Participate in demobilization processes within the activated
healthcare organization (such as a VHA Medical Center and/or within its
overarching Veterans Integrated Service Network) to disengage resources
from incident response and allow return to normal operations or back to
stand-by status.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o EPM-R8.1: Describe both the general objectives of the demobilization
process and the specific management issues associated with
demobilization, rehabilitation of response elements, and preparation to
return to routine professional roles.
Skills
o EPM-R8.2: Assist in the demobilization of the healthcare organization and
its resources by verifying that operational objectives have been met (or are
reassigned to continuing units) and that appropriate internal and external
notification is made regarding demobilization.
o EPM-R8.3: Participate in any initial incident review (commonly known as
a “hot wash”) and assist organizational leadership with ensuring
appropriate procedures are followed for maintaining/preserving
information for the After Action Report process.
o EPM-R8.4: Assist with the debriefing and performance assessments of
response personnel under your supervision, and others as requested by the
organization’s incident manager.
x
EPM-R9: Assist, as indicated by assigned position in recovery management,
with healthcare organization recovery to full pre-incident function, including
return to routine facility management and medical care activities.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o EPM-R9.1: Describe the incident planning and management processes for
transitioning from response to recovery.
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o EPM-R9.2: Describe the procedures and priorities for returning response
resources and the overall organization to pre-incident operations and
management.
o EPM-R9.3: Describe the process required to re-evaluate the healthcare
organization’s patient population and post-incident patient care activities,
which includes addressing the backlog of regular work.
Skills
o EPM-R9.4: Assist, as requested, with personnel rehabilitation by
providing advice on procedures for addressing physical or psychological
concerns.
o EPM-R9.5: Assist, as requested, with facility and equipment rehabilitation
by establishing priority of recovery activities and identifying additional
resources that may be required.
o EPM-R9.6: Assist, as requested, with addressing backlogs of regular work
by providing advice to facility leaders on surge capacity methods and the
prioritization of backlogged services.
x
EPM-R10: Fulfill emergency management program requirements for a
formal incident After-Action Report (AAR) process that captures and
processes recommended changes to achieve organizational learning.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o EPM-R10.1: Describe the policies and procedures as well as other
considerations for completing the formal After Action Report on
healthcare system response.
o EPM-R10.2: Describe procedures for capturing information, analysis and
acceptance or recommendations, and implementation of changes to a
healthcare system EOP and overarching emergency management program.
Skills
o EPM-R10.3: Conduct efficient After Action Reports by utilizing incident
response procedures for conducting a meeting and by ensuring After
Action Report items are documented in the required format (i.e., issue,
background, recommended action, responsible party and recommended
timeframe).
o EPM-R10.4: Ensure organizational learning by conducting appropriate
analysis of recommendations, obtaining formal administration approval of
accepted recommendations, and incorporating the recommended changes
into the healthcare system EOP and other components of the emergency
management program.
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Healthcare System Leaders (HSL)
Hospital and/or healthcare system-wide senior executives (CEO, COO, CFO), hospitalwide managers, department heads, nursing executives, chief of the medical staff, and/or
senior managers in large departments or key operating units. It is assumed that members
of this job group, due to their everyday organizational positions, would be assigned to
serve in the command and general staff positions of an ICS structure during a healthcare
system’s emergency response.
x
HSL-R1: Identify specific criteria of potential events that require the full or
partial activation of the system’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP).
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o HSL-R1.1: Describe the specific characteristics of potential events that
would require EOP full or partial activation.
o HSL-R1.2: Describe the impact of EOP activation (full or partial) upon
day-to-day facility operations.
o HSL-R1.3: Describe potential sources of information that may assist with
incident recognition.
Skills
o HSL-R1.4: Demonstrate understanding of criteria for EOP full or partial
activation by initiating appropriate levels of EOP activation rapidly during
specific events.
o HSL-R1.5: Ensure appropriate decisions are made about EOP activation
by considering the impact of EOP activation (full or partial) upon day-today facility operations including the provision of essential services to
existing patient populations.
o HSL-R1.6: Ensure appropriate information is included in the decision to
activate the EOP (as necessary) by coordinating with facility personnel
who have relevant information or who have expertise relevant to the
incident type.
o HSL-R1.7: Ensure appropriate information from external sources is
considered in the decision to activate the EOP by coordinating with
external agencies that may provide incident-related information.
x
HSL-R2: Activate or support activation of the Emergency Operations Plan
(EOP) to manage emergency response.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R2.1: Describe the EOP activation and notification process.
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
o HSL-R2.2: List the types of notification for the facility and specific
functional areas.
o HSL-R2.3: List relevant external agencies that should be notified of the
system’s EOP activation (full or partial); e.g. VHA/VISN administrators,
local public health, local public safety, etc.
o HSL-R2.4: Describe the initial reporting process from the notified
functional areas in order to determine receipt of the notification message
and initial resource availability.
Skills
o HSL-R2.5: Ensure appropriate EOP activation by identifying personnel
with authority to activate the EOP and using the established methods for
activation.
o HSL-R2.6: Ensure awareness of EOP activation by determining and
conducting the appropriate level of notification (update, alert, advisory,
activation) for the system, specific functional areas, and external agencies
as applicable.
o HSL-R2.7: Confirm the activation of functional areas (management,
operations, logistics, plans/information, finance/administration) by
receiving and processing confirmation of notifications.
x
HSL-R3: Ensure rapid system mobilization that transitions response
personnel and resources from day-to-day activities to their designated
incident response status.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R3.1: Describe the management positions responsible for assuring
mobilization of all key resources and personnel in the healthcare system’s
EOP, and the reporting process for determining mobilization status.
o HSL-R3.2: Describe the layout, location of supplies, and set-up of the
facility Incident Command Post (ICP) or alternatively (according to the
organization’s EOP), the healthcare facility’s Emergency Operations
Center (EOC) with a smaller ICP at the site of primary response activity.
Skills
o HSL-R3.3: Confirm the mobilization of functional areas (management,
operations, logistics, plans/information, finance/administration) by
receiving and processing confirmation of mobilization and full readiness
for response.
o HSL-R3.4: Ensure adequate resources and facilities are available for the
healthcare system including assisting with or supervising (as indicated by
leader position) establishment of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
and Incident Command Post (ICP) for the organization.
o HSL-R3.5: Review the mobilized command and general staff area of the
ICP or EOC to confirm that those positions can fully operate in their
positions.
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
x
HSL-R4: Ensure appropriate execution of the healthcare system Occupant
Emergency Procedures (OEP) by assuring appropriate protective actions for
patients, staff and visitors, and for the integrity of the healthcare system.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R4.1: Describe the decision process for activating the OEP and how
the OEP functions within the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) for the
organization.
o HSL-R4.2: Describe the accountability processes for staff, patients,
visitors, vital records, and critical equipment and how the overall and final
accountability is confirmed.
o HSL-R4.3: List critical external resources required to support OEP
activation.
Skills
o HSL-R4.4: Make decisions during OEP implementation that reflect the
prioritized system objectives of life safety, incident stabilization, and
protection of mission critical property and operating systems.
o HSL-R4.5: Demonstrate oversight of accountability for staff, patients,
visitors and mission critical systems.
x
HSL-R5: Ensure that the system’s incident management is effective, utilizes
Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) procedures and processes, and uses a
pro-active ‘management by objective’ approach.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o HSL-R5.1: Describe the functional organization of the healthcare system’s
incident management during emergency response and recovery and how
the activated incident management team (IMT) interacts through the
agency executive with the enterprise’s ongoing management and operating
systems.
o HSL-R5.2: Describe the initial reactive phase of the healthcare system’s
incident response and the important transition to pro-active ‘management
by objectives.’
o HSL-R5.3: Describe the healthcare system’s code of ethics and how it is
considered/applied during incident planning and management decisionmaking procedures during emergency response and recovery.
Skills
o HSL-R5.4: Ensure the healthcare system’s incident management structure
is well delineated by formally assigning facility incident management
positions and providing the organizational structure with assignments
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
o
o
o
o
x
(System ICS diagram) to relevant parties both internal and external to the
system.
HSL-R5.5: Provide pro-active incident management by developing,
analyzing, and revising, as necessary, facility response objectives during
management meetings in the Planning Cycle (management by objectives).
HSL-R5.6: Ensure that healthcare system response objectives are
efficiently and adequately met by performing continual monitoring of the
system’s incident response system and outcomes.
HSL-R5.7: Ensure the healthcare system’s code of ethics is applied, as
appropriate, by considering it during response planning and decisionmaking.
HSL-R5.8: Address limitations of the healthcare system’s EOP capacity
and capability by identifying limitations and developing responseappropriate options to address unmet needs.
HSL-R6: Manage continuous incident action planning through iterative
planning cycle procedures that provide strategic and general tactical
guidance to healthcare system personnel in order to achieve surge capacity,
surge capability, and organizational resiliency.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: expert level
Knowledge
o HSL-R6.1: Describe the purpose of management meetings, planning
meetings, and operations briefings for emergency response and recovery.
o HSL-R6.2: Describe the key components of the healthcare system’s
response Incident Action Plan and methods of dissemination, both
internally and externally.
o HSL-R6.3: Describe the purpose and the components of long term,
alternative, contingency, and demobilization planning.
Skills
o HSL-R6.4: Ensure the clear delineation of the healthcare system’s
operations cycle by establishing and disseminating the timing of planning
meetings and operational periods.
o HSL-R6.5: Ensure facility objectives are met by supervising the
development, analysis, and revision of facility response strategies and
general tactics.
o HSL-R6.6: Ensure healthcare system personnel safety by identifying,
minimizing, or preventing threats/hazards, and by responding to all real or
potential safety issues for healthcare system response (Safety Plan)
throughout the emergency response and recovery.
o HSL-R6.7: Ensure efficient incident planning, as indicated by your
incident management position, by participating in or conducting structured
planning and management meetings, and operations briefings.
o HSL-R6.8: Ensure appropriate dissemination of incident planning
decisions by documenting and disseminating the healthcare system’s
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Incident Action Plans to relevant persons internal and external to the
facility.
o HSL-R6.9: Demonstrate comprehensive incident planning by performing
or assigning analysis of long term, alternative, contingency, and
demobilization plans during response and recovery.
o HSL-R6.10: Manage efficient exchange of information by participating in
shift change briefings.
x
HSL-R7: Manage efficient information processing regarding response
activities
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R7.1: Describe the components and timing of functional area
reporting and how the results can be processed and analyzed to identify
progress or problems in meeting the facility’s incident objectives.
o HSL-R7.2: Describe critical sources of incident information external to the
healthcare system.
o HSL-R7.3: Describe procedures for reporting back to functional areas,
including dissemination of the healthcare system’s Incident Action Plan.
o HSL-R7.4: Describe types of event parameters that would require sudden
changes in response strategies or tactics.
Skills
o HSL-R7.5: Ensure adequate functional area reporting by establishing the
timing of the reporting and verifying that reports include a situation
description, resource status, specific tactics utilized, progress
accomplished, and unusual problems encountered (include patient tracking
as necessary).
o HSL-R7.6: Include information originating external to the healthcare
system in the planning process by monitoring external sources for
information (including the level of response by external organizations) and
considering them in the planning process.
o HSL-R7.7: Ensure awareness of event parameters within the healthcare
system by providing continual updates to the leaders of functional areas
and to external agencies as appropriate.
o HSL-R7.8: Provide early response to contingencies by monitoring sudden
changes in event parameters that necessitate immediate revision of
response strategies and tactics and by disseminating appropriate
notification to relevant parties (internal and external).
x
HSL-R8: Provide information on the facility’s emergency response and
recovery activities to patients, patients’ families, facility personnel’s families,
the media, and the general public, as appropriate.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Knowledge
o HSL-R8.1: Describe the methods of delivering information to the media
and the important components of the message.
o HSL-R8.2: Describe procedures used to ensure patients, patients’ families,
and facility personnel’s families are kept apprised of response operations.
o HSL-R8.3: Describe coordination techniques that ensure the facility’s
media message is consistent with other organizations’ messages to the
public.
o HSL-R8.4: Describe HIPAA and its application to emergency response
and recovery as well as other patient confidentiality measures.
Skills
o HSL-R8.5: Ensure the continuous update of relevant parties by providing,
or assigning the task of providing, incident updates and the timing of
subsequent update reports.
o HSL-R8.6: Ensure media messages are appropriate and consistent with
that of other organizations by coordinating with the external community
incident managers and public information personnel.
o HSL-R8.7: Identify public perceptions of the facility’s response and false
information relating to the facility’s response by performing monitoring of
media reports (address falsehoods as indicated).
o HSL-R8.8: Ensure confidentiality of patient information by monitoring
response and recovery actions for adherence to these standards where
applicable.
x
HSL-R9: Monitor the response and recovery needs of the facility’s functional
areas, and, if needed, provide support with additional facilities, equipment,
communications, personnel or other assistance.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R9.1: Describe resource-tracking processes for the facility.
o HSL-R9.2: Describe the resource request processes for functional areas in
the facility to request both internal and external resources.
o HSL-R9.3: List the critical elements of a Communications Plan.
o HSL-R9.4: List potential sources of technical assistance.
o HSL-R9.5: Describe procedures for ensuring the health and well-being of
facility personnel.
o HSL-R9.6: Describe integration methods of outside donated resources
(personnel, equipment, supplies).
Skills
o HSL-R9.7: Demonstrate the ability to anticipate functional area requests
by conducting an adequate incident planning process.
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
o HSL-R9.8: Provide logistical support to functional areas, first by
identifying functional area needs and then appropriate resources to meet
those needs.
o HSL-R9.9: Provide communication support to functional areas by
assisting with the development and approval of the facility
Communications Plan, which should document and disseminate contact
methods for relevant parties internal and external to the facility.
o HSL-R9.10: Provide technical assistance to functional areas, as indicated,
by identifying outside subject matter experts or other appropriate
information resources.
o HSL-R9.11: Ensure the health and well-being of facility personnel by
participating in/approving the Medical Plan for the IAP (as indicated by
your management position).
o HSL-R9.12: Assist with the integration of external assistance and supplies,
solicited and unsolicited, by managing them until they are assigned to
specific functional areas.
x
HSL-R10: Establish appropriate measures to document, track, or reimburse
financial costs associated with facility response and recovery.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R10.1: Describe processes for tracking personnel and resources
utilized during response.
o HSL-R10.2: Describe processes for compensating personnel utilized
during response and for claims made by these personnel.
o HSL-R10.3: Describe processes for reimbursement of external assistance
provided during response.
o HSL-R10.4: Describe processes for tracking other costs of response (e.g.
delayed elective procedures, equipment and supplies consumed, etc).
Skills
o HSL-R10.5: Provide for personnel compensation by maintaining lists of
personnel utilized during response and time worked.
o HSL-R10.6: Provide for incident expense claims by ensuring appropriate
documentation is completed and submitted within the required time
periods.
o HSL-R10.7: Provide for equipment and supply reimbursement by tracking
lists of supplies and equipment utilized during response and recovery.
o HSL-R10.8: Provide for compensation of external assistance (contract or
cooperative assistance) by tracking utilization of these resources and
ensuring prompt payment as indicated.
o HSL-R10.9: Provide a summary of response and recovery impact on
facility finances by documenting and analyzing the direct and indirect
costs of EOP activation, including lost revenue.
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
x
HSL-R11: Manage facility response so that it adheres to appropriate
regulations and standards or seek relief as required.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R11.1: Describe permissible emergency response and recovery
deviations from the normal standard of medical care provided under
normal facility conditions, and the processes for seeking temporary
suspension or relaxation of regulations during emergencies.
o HSL-R11.2: Describe, in general, the applicable public health laws and
their impact on the facility’s emergency response and recovery.
o HSL-R11.3: Describe the process for verifying the credentials of
healthcare and other professionals, from resources external to the facility,
who offer assistance to the healthcare facility.
o HSL-R11.4: Describe potential liability exposures that could occur for the
facility and its patient care staff during emergency response and recovery.
Skills
o HSL-R11.5: Address appropriate healthcare regulatory issues during
response and recovery by monitoring response activities for regulatory
compliance and correcting deviations or appropriately justifying and
explaining them.
o HSL-R11.6: Request and obtain appropriate regulatory relief by contacting
appropriate authorities and providing explanations of, and justifications
for, the requests.
o HSL-R11.7: Ensure appropriate credentialing and privileging of response
personnel (from internal or external sources) to perform healthcare tasks,
within the facility’s operations, by monitoring personnel activities for
conformance to their specific expertise.
o HSL-R11.8: Provide facility and personnel liability protection by
documenting incident details surrounding occurrences with potential legal
liability.
x
HSL-R12: Ensure that the Business Continuity Program considerations are
incorporated into the facility’s Incident Action Planning (IAP) process.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R12.1: Describe the purpose and importance of a Business
Continuity Program that is fully integrated into the facility EOP.
o HSL-R12.2: Describe the elements and supporting functions of a Business
Continuity Program as outlined in the NFPA 1600 Standard on
Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs,
2004 Edition.
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
o HSL-R12.3: Describe how the Business Continuity Program aligns with
overall Incident Command System (ICS) organization and procedures.
Skills
o HSL-R12.4: Include business continuity specific objectives in the Incident
Action Planning process in order to address the recovery, resumption, and
restoration of facility-specific services.
o HSL-R12.5: Use (as appropriate) the Business Continuity support annex
forms and guidance during emergency response and recovery.
x
HSL-R13: Assure that incident-specific safety guidance, in the form of an
Incident Safety Plan and/or IAP safety message, is developed by the Safety
Officer position through action planning and appropriately disseminated to
responders.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R13.1: Describe the importance of empowering the safety office
position to stop or alter incident operations that present immediate safety
risks to responders, staff, patients, visitors or the integrity of the healthcare
system.
Skills
o HSL-R13.2: Provide technical advice and other input into the safety plan
and safety message development as indicated by technical background and
the assigned position in Command and General Staff of the Incident
Management Team (IMT).
x
HSL-R14: Ensure rapid and effective demobilization of the healthcare
organization’s response resources, and eventually the emergency response
itself, as the organization transitions to recovery operations.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R14.1: Describe the management of demobilization and the
important processes that must occur during the demobilization process.
o HSL-R14.2: Describe methods used to formally announce full or partial
demobilization.
o HSL-R14.3: Describe procedures for out-processing of personnel.
o HSL-R14.4: Describe the procedures for conducting an initial incident
review.
Skills
o HSL-R14.5: Guide the orderly demobilization of functional areas by
ensuring that demobilization occurs as soon as the facility and/or resources
are no longer needed for response (i.e. their specific response objectives
have been met or otherwise resolved).
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
o HSL-R14.6: Provide clear explanation and notification of demobilization
to relevant parties (internal and external), usually by demonstrating that
response objectives have been met.
o HSL-R14.7: Provide adequate out-processing of response personnel by
ensuring adequate debriefings and assessments of performance as
appropriate.
o HSL-R14.8: Provide for an orderly initial incident review process
(commonly known as a “hot wash”) by utilizing response procedures to
conduct the meeting.
x
HSL-R15: Ensure recovery is accomplished to restore the healthcare
organization to baseline operations and to capture important lessons for
organizational improvement.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o HSL-R15.1: Describe the overall process for managing the return of the
organization to baseline operations and all activities to regular
management oversight, including addressing the backlog of regular
workload that accumulated during emergency operations.
o HSL-R15.2: List critical equipment, priorities for rehabilitation, and the
methods for re-certifying the equipment for future use.
o HSL-R15.3: Describe the process for facility re-certification (if
applicable).
o HSL-R15.4: Describe the personnel rehabilitation process.
o HSL-R15.5: Describe the After-Action Report process and methods
utilized to keep the process orderly and constructive.
Skills
o HSL-R15.6: Manage the initial recovery operations by employing the
same incident management structure and processes as used for the
emergency response phase, with new objectives, personnel, and
departmental assignments as needed; transition the management of
residual recovery operations to everyday administrative functions as
recovery management is terminated.
o HSL-R15.7: Manage rehabilitation and re-certification for use of
equipment and incident facilities by prioritizing areas for initial attention.
o HSL-R15.8: Provide for personnel rehabilitation by disseminating the
methods for response personnel to address psychological and/or physical
concerns.
o HSL-R15.9: Oversee the After-Action Report process by using facility
procedures and processes that capture response deficiencies and best
practices, and that incorporate accepted changes as EOP and emergency
management program revisions (i.e., organizational learning).
Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
The George Washington University
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Appendix C – Healthcare Emergency Management Competencies
Patient Care Provider (PCP)
Physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nurses
working within expanded roles (CRNA, RNP, and others), emergency medical
technicians, paramedics, and respiratory therapists and others who provide direct clinical
patient care. Not included are clinical support staff that provide patient care services
under the direct supervision of patient care providers: e.g., nurse’s aides, procedure
technicians, orderlies, and others.
x
PCP-R1: Recognize situations related to patient care that indicate the need
for full or partial activation of the healthcare system’s Emergency
Operations Plan (EOP), and report them appropriately and promptly.
Recommended proficiency for Primary Competency: operations level
Knowledge
o PCP-R1.1: Describe patient presentation criteria (unusual signs and
symptoms indicative of deliberate illness/injury, indications of potentially
epidemic illness/injury, unexpected rapid patient deterioration, difficult
patient interventions such as decontamination, etc.) that indicate the
possible need for EOP activation.
o PCP-R1.2: Describe patient population profiles and other situation-based
criteria (unusual numbers, very unusual contagiousness and other
indications of increased risk to response personnel or current patients, etc.)
that indicate the possible need for EOP activation.
o PCP-R1.3 Describe resources available to Patient Care Providers in
obtaining additional patient or situational information related to
determining the need for activating the EOP.
o PCP-R1.4: Describe the reporting requirements and the contact methods
when events are recognized that may indicate the need for possible EOP
activation (full or partial).
Skills
o PCP-R1.5: Identify situations within the regular clinical care area that
should be reported for consideration of full or partial activation of the
healthcare facility’s EOP.
o PCP-R1.6: Report situations within the regular clinical care area by
following EOP notification procedures and contacting the appropriate
person (e.g., page operator, supervisor, etc.) as indicated by your specific
role and by…
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