After completeing FLIGBY, scenes 1-23, and the assigned readings, access your FLIGBY Metrix Individual Report.Note the 29 skills that were assessed, and answer the following questions:What have you learned about your strengths and how they relate to finding flow in yourself and promoting flow in others?What have you learned about your weakness? Cover at least three, and include scholarly sources related to each one identified. When you include these, discuss the skill you need to improve as well as proven strategies for improvement.Assure your paper is APA format, and use at least three academic resources that help you better understand the highest and lowest rated skills based on your individual assessment. For example, if motivation is a problem identified in your assessment, research scholarly articles on motivation, and develop your paper based on what you learned through your research.®
Your FLIGBY Profile
Flow-Leadership Report
’s
This Report was prepared for
Derrick Newkirk
Using “Flow is Good Business” Gaming Analytics
Developed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and ALEAS Simulations, California
12 February 2020
FLIGBY® is the official Flow Program for decision-makers by Professor Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi and ALEAS Simulations. FLIGBY’s leadership development
program combines videogame learning experience with benchmark-based
competence assessment.
FLIGBY has won the Gold Medal of the “International Serious Play Awards” in the
category of Corporate Games. A global panel of experts selected FLIGBY as the
best digital game for managers of the year 2012. FLIGBY also gained the
Certification of the American Serious Games Association, which draws the
attention of the corporate decision-makers to innovative and forward-looking
training solutions.
©2017 ALEAS Simulations, Inc., California, All Rights Reserved
“FLIGBY”, “FLOW is Good Business for You”, “Turul Winery”; “Spirit of the Wine Award”
and all logos, characters, artwork, stories, information, names, gameplay, feedback
mechanisms and other elements associated thereto are the sole and exclusive property
of ALEAS.
www.fligby.com, www.flowleadership.org
Report design & layout by Robert Fekete – www.behance.net/robtmc
Report for Derrick Newkirk
1
1. Welcome
1.1. GREETINGS BY PROF. CSIKSZENTMIHALYI
Dear Derrick,
On behalf of our FLIGBY team, I would like to thank you for having invested your
time and effort into playing the Game. I sincerely hope that you have been
enlightened and enriched by the experience.
Being a manager or a leader is never easy. Our decisions shape not only our
organization’s competitive performance but also the fate of our colleagues. This is
a huge responsibility, whether one is managing a small California winery, a giant
multinational, an NGO, or a government bureau.
We have attempted to weave into the Turul Winery story many of the dilemmas
typically encountered in managing an organization: strategy, competition,
technology, profitability, and environmental sustainability. The main emphasis,
however, is on people management. One aspect of it is creating the conditions and
advancing the trust in others that are preconditions for experiencing Flow.
It was 50 years ago that I started to study people who loved what they were doing
Report for Derrick Newkirk
2
1. Welcome
– chess players, mountain climbers, actors, and business persons – trying to
understand what made them do those things, and to do them well. Most said that
experiencing the activity itself was the main reward. I labeled this experience
“Flow”.
There has been growing recognition in recent years that getting into Flow is one of
the most important factors in improving individual, group, and community
performance. The problem we have been working on with the FLIGBY team is this:
“Why is it that so few jobs and workplaces are designed to make Flow possible?”
This is a fact even though it is in the power of managers/leaders to take many easy
steps to facilitate Flow.
FLIGBY is an innovative extension of my Good Business book, published in 2003.
Our aim is to help every decision-maker – a role we often play even as individuals
without fancy titles – to have attitudes and to make choices that will improve not
only our own well-being and the effectiveness of our organizations, but also that of
the community and of society at large.
It is my sincere hope that this personal report will assist you in your lifelong
personal development journey. This Report shows your apparent strengths to build
upon and seeming weaknesses to overcome so that you can be an ever-moresuccessful manager/leader.
May you experience Flow often! And may you have the wisdom to help others to
experience it, too.
P.S. Please check p. 8, inviting you to help us, with a few simple steps, to disseminate
the idea of Flow-promoting leadership.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
3
1. Welcome
1.2. HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF THIS REPORT?
The time you spent playing FLIGBY was a valuable investment. This detailed
Report is built on the basis of those decisions you have taken throughout the
Game. The Report consists of four sections:
1
WELCOME
Summarizes the main messages and key values of the FLIGBY
Simulation. Invites you to join our network to benefit yourself and
others by spreading the idea of a value-driven and Flow-promoting
workplace.
2
YOUR GAMEPLAY RESULTS
This part of your Report lists the “key performance indicators” (KPIs) and
the virtual characters’ subjective feedback
on your performance, given your Game results.
FEEDBACK
ON YOUR
FLIGBY PERFORMANCE
ARE SUMMARIZED
IN TWO
3
YOUR LEADERSHIP SKILLS PROFILE
CHAPTERS
This part of your Report is an unbiased analysis
of your 29 Flow Leadership Skills. Your skill measures are based on your
gameplay responses when key managerial decisions were called for.
4
IF YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE
More details and explanations about the Game. You’ll find a discussion
of the following topics: FLIGBY’s game-based analytics to identify your
real leadership potential; additional KPIs; and Mr. Fligby’s subjective
opinions about your leadership practice.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
4
1. Welcome
1.3. CONTENTS
1. Welcome
1.1. Greetings by Prof. Csikszentmihalyi
2
1.2. How to get the most out of this Report?
4
1.3. Contents
5
1.4. Flow and Good Business
6
1.5. Join our Global Flow-promoting Leadership Network
8
2. Your Gameplay Results
2.1. Your gaming progress
9
2.2. Spirit of the Wine Award
10
2.3. Flow trophies
11
2.4. Corporate atmosphere
12
2.5. Profitability
13
2.6. Your colleagues’ “no-holds-barred” comments on you as their manager
14
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3.1. What skills are measured and how to interpret them?
16
3.2. Your 29 leadership skills
18
3.3. Distribution curve and Percentile rankings
19
3.4. Your top 3 Skills identified, compared and explained
20
3.5. Your most to-be-improved skills identified, compared and explained
23
4. If You Want to Know More
4.1. A Game-based approach to identifying your leadership potential
26
4.2. More about winning the Spirit of the Wine Award
27
4.3. More about the “Hit” Percentage of Your Decisions
28
4.4. More about the “Flow Map”
29
4.5. More about Your “Sum Flow” Index
31
4.6. Your colleagues’ final positions on the Flow Map
32
4.7. The 29 leadership skills: definitions
34
4.8. Mr. Fligby’s “no-punches-pulled” opinion on you as a leader
38
QUICK FINDER – OVERVIEW OF YOUR FLIGBY RESULTS
Spirit of the Wine Award
10
Your 29 leadership skills
18
Your colleagues’ final positions on the Flow Map
32
Mr. Fligby’s personal feedback
38
Report for Derrick Newkirk
5
1. Welcome
1.4. FLOW AND GOOD BUSINESS
FLIGBY was created as a guide for conducting business that is both successful and
humane. While most people enjoy working when it provides Flow, too few jobs are
designed to make Flow possible. This is where management can make a real
difference. For a manager or leader who truly cares about the bottom line, in the
broadest sense of that term, the first priority is to eliminate the obstacles to Flow
at all levels of the organization and to put in place practices and policies designed
to make work meaningful and thus enjoyable, especially for “knowledge workers”.
WHY IS FLOW IMPORTANT?
When we are in the state of Flow, we perform at our peak. Not only do our productivity
levels soar, but we also experience a deep sense of satisfaction. Work becomes a source
of enjoyment.
Flow is being in the zone, getting into the groove – in other words, being in a totally optimal
state for peak performance. It is that magical time when everything seems to come
together – you become fully immersed in the activity, fears and insecurities melt away,
action becomes spontaneous, and you feel fully alive and in the present moment.
Prof. Csikszentmihalyi’s term, “good business”, means a meaningful and enjoyable
work environment, through which a business’ (or any organization’s) “balanced
scorecard” improves, thereby contributing to healthier and more sustainable
workplaces and societies at large.
The best way to manage people is to create an environment where employees find
meaning in their work and grow while doing it. Organizations whose co-workers
are happy are more productive, have a higher morale, and lower turnover.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
6
1. Welcome
Work should be meaningful and also fun (as much as possible). Companies should
of course care about the bottom line, but not only about maximizing short-term
profits. If there is Flow in your business, employees perform at their peak and work
becomes a source of enjoyment and personal growth. Your organization will
become a place that people look forward to being a part of.
Our jobs have a significant influence on the quality of our lives. Happiness is not
something that happens to us, but rather, it is something we make happen. As
such, work can be one of the most fulfilling aspects of life, provided that
employees have an opportunity to do their best and to contribute to something
greater than themselves.
“… Today business leaders are among the most influential members of
society. While they are all trained to generate profits, many of them are
oblivious to the other responsibilities that their new societal leadership
entails. To be successful you have to enjoy doing your best while at the
same time contributing to something beyond yourself. Perhaps the most
important distinguishing trait of visionary leaders is that they believe in a
goal that benefits not only themselves, but others as well. It is such a vision
that attracts the psychic energy of other people, and makes them willing to
work beyond the call of duty for the organization.”
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
GOOD BUSINESS: LEADERSHIP, FLOW, AND THE MAKING OF MEANING
Report for Derrick Newkirk
7
1. Welcome
1.5. JOIN OUR GLOBAL FLOW-PROMOTING LEADERSHIP NETWORK
Here are a few simple, no-cost suggestions on how you can support the
dissemination of the Flow-promoting Leadership in any organization:
1. Find out more! – Discover the “missing link” and read the FLIGBY story
with Csikszentmihalyi’s thoughts: flowleadership.org/our-new-book/
2. Invite others! – If you have a friend or colleague who you think might be
interested in leadership development simulations, we are glad to send a
demo account. Let us know on demo@fligby.com.
3. Help to spread the idea! – Do you know any organizations that the “good
business” approach might make stronger and more effective? Please
send us your suggestions, we would be glad to get in touch with them:
goodbusiness@fligby.com
4. Be part of the discovery! – Would you, or others you know, be interested
in joining our official “Leadership & Flow” research program that studies
innovative approaches of leadership? We are happy to welcome you at
flowleadership.org/contact-us/
Please stay in touch with us on our social media interfaces:
Official FLIGBY Blog:
flowleadership.org/articles
Linkedin:
linkedin.com/company/fligby
Facebook:
facebook.com/fligby
Youtube:
youtube.com/fligby
Pinterest:
pinterest.com/fligby
Report for Derrick Newkirk
8
2. Your Gameplay Results
2.1. YOUR GAMING PROGRESS
GAME DATA
Game registration mail sent:
5 February 2020 3:09PM
Game started:
6 February 2020 1:48AM
Game finished:
12 February 2020 4:47PM
Your gameplay time:
04 h 24 m
Gameplay time of all the players (average):
06 h 31 m
Media Library Items Opened* by you:
4%
Media Library Items Opened* by all players:
25%
*Shows what percentage of the information available in Media Library you have clicked on.
If you have further questions, contact your Host(s). You can find your
Host(s)’ profiles on “My Group” page.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
9
2. Your Gameplay Results
It is important to stress that winning or not winning the Game, and the other
performance indicators listed below, are not directly linked to your skills profile.
In other words, it is possible to win or not to win the Award (and to show
impressive or poor gameplay results) with all sorts of skills profile
combinations.
2.2. SPIRIT OF THE WINE AWARD
Although you did not win the Award,
“Spirit of the Wine Award” is the
you have impressive leadership skills
ultimate prize to win in FLIGBY.
and other Game results.
It is a measure of the Player’s
success in skillfully balancing
difficult tradeoffs, such as
generating individual Flow,
improving the corporate
atmosphere, earning satisfactory
profit, and adequately protecting
the environment.*
* For more information about the Award,
refer to section 4.2. below, “More about
The winning-ratio in the full FLIGBY
winning the Spirit of the Wine Award”
population is 47%
Report for Derrick Newkirk
10
2. Your Gameplay Results
2.3. FLOW TROPHIES
Each time your decisions helped put a colleague into Flow, you won a Flow
trophy. Your trophy inventory at the end of your gameplay is as follows:
YOU EARNED 9 OF MAX 21 FLOW TROPHIES!
The average number of Flow trophies earned by all FLIGBY players is 12.9
A key task of FLIGBY is to create an environment that promotes teamwork and
enhances Flow. Thus, one of the key aims of the Game was to bring as many
colleagues as possible – even if just for a short time – into a Flow state. Please
note that expanding too great an effort to put someone repeatedly into Flow can
move others away from their Flow state.
Earning many Flow trophies is positive, up to a point. However, earning fewer than
the average number of trophies is not necessarily bad; it may show that you gave
higher priorities to some of the other Game objectives.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
11
2. Your Gameplay Results
These labels and colors are used further on in this Report:
#1
Your first gameplay’s result
fl
Average of all FLIGBY players
2.4. CORPORATE ATMOSPHERE
CORP. ATM.%
The “CORPORATE ATMOSPHERE” METER of the
#1
51
Turul Winery shows the level of workplace satisfaction
fl
64
by the entire workforce.
A good corporate atmosphere is one where the goals are clear to everyone;
relevant information is available to all; and the challenges faced by everyone are
manageable because they match each employee’s skill level. In other words, there
is a highly satisfactory and productive atmosphere for all internal stakeholders,
which would maximally support the sustainable advancement of the organization.
This KPI shows, in percentage terms, how far your managerial decisions have
created a satisfactory atmosphere for all internal stakeholders.
The graph below shows the scene-by-scene evolution (for each of the 23 Scenes)
of Turul’s Corporate Atmosphere, as a function of your decisions:
100
75
50
25
0
Report for Derrick Newkirk
12
2. Your Gameplay Results
2.5. PROFITABILITY
PROFIT %
This indicator shows the impact of your decisions on
#1
64
the Winery’s revenue-generating potential, in percent
fl
71
terms, relative to the maximum achievable.
It shows the direction of the Winery’s profit-generating capability rather than
actual profit data.
The graph below shows the scene-by-scene evolution of Turul’s Profitability, as a
function of your decisions:
100
50
0
-50
-100
Report for Derrick Newkirk
13
2. Your Gameplay Results
2.6. YOUR COLLEAGUES’ “NO-HOLDS-BARRED” COMMENTS ON YOU AS THEIR MANAGER
Your colleagues’ comments below are responses to the decision-path you,
yourself, chose during the Game:
WHAT DO YOUR TEAM MEMBERS THINK ABOUT YOUR LEADERSHIP?
ELLEN
JOE
LARRY
REBECCA
CHRIS
ALEX
Ellen: “I will love to move to HR! Thanks for thinking creatively about my options here, and
not discriminating against me due to my age. ”
Joe: “I wanted to thank you for dealing with time management. I am learning to work more
effectively with my colleagues. ”
Larry: “I just wanted to thank you for letting me leave the Bacchus Boutique meeting… early
that day. You showed real empathy for me. I wouldn’t have wanted to miss the birth of my
child. ”
Rebecca: “I’m glad you supported my decision to leave. I’m sure I’ll be happy at Top Dog
winery. And this party is wonderful! I’m so impressed with Jen. However, she is a fantastic
assistant, I know she’ll be hard to replace in her role. ”
Chris: “Larry and I learned to work together as a team. It was thanks to your intervention. So
enjoy the party. ”
Alex: “I wanted to thank you for your commitment to discontinuing our “jug” wine. You
showed integrity. I respect that. Have a good time tonight. ”
Report for Derrick Newkirk
14
2. Your Gameplay Results
You have the option also to hear their opinions from their own mouths. Check out
these brief clips!
ELLEN
JOE
LARRY
REBECCA
CHRIS
ALEX
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15
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3.1. WHAT SKILLS ARE MEASURED AND HOW TO INTERPRET THEM?
In FLIGBY, your leadership profile is comprised of your scores on each of the 29
leadership competences. Good skill combinations are helpful for creating and
maintaining a Flow-promoting organizational culture.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Active
listening
Analytical
skill
Assertiveness
Balancing
skill
6.
7.
Businessoriented
thinking
8.
CommuniConflictcation
management
12.
Empowerment
9.
10.
11.
Delegating
Diplomacy
Emotional
intelligence
14.
13.
5.
Engagement and
trust
Entrepreneur- Execution
ship
15.
16.
Feedback
Future
orientation
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Information
gathering
Intuitive
thinking
Involvement
Motivation
Organizing
Prioritizing
23.
Timepressured
decisions
24.
25.
26.
27.
Personal
strengths
Social
dynamics
Stakeholder
management
Strategic
thinking
28.
29.
Teamwork
Time
management management
The four skills – shown in green with white borders – are those that contribute
most directly to the attainment of a Flow-promoting workplace. For the definition
of each skill, see: section 4.7.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
16
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
Your skill measures are based on your gameplay responses when important
managerial decisions were called for. Your skill measures are objective and
unbiased. However, a game such as FLIGBY could give you only limited
opportunities to display the leadership skills you may possess. At the same time,
what you did reveal by the decision choices you made has been carefully
interpreted, in terms of their skill implications, by a prestigious group of
psychologists and leadership-development experts.
Lower skill levels show, first and foremost, that you made rather infrequent use of
those skills during the gameplay. Thus, lower skill levels do not necessarily mean
that your skills are notably weak in those areas. Nevertheless, low skill levels may
indicate that a purposeful strengthening of those skills would likely to improve
your managerial/leadership performance. The numbers in the charts below
represent the percentage (max 100) achievable skill levels in the Game.
“In creating one’s self, it makes sense to build on one’s strengths. Often,
however, we don’t have good notion of what our talents are, because we
have never had a chance to try them out. The more opportunities one is
willing to explore, the better chances one has of discovering one’s
strengths.”
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
GOOD BUSINESS: LEADERSHIP, FLOW, AND THE MAKING OF MEANING
Report for Derrick Newkirk
17
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3.2. YOUR 29 LEADERSHIP SKILLS
Active listening
65 63
Analytical skill
50 63
Assertiveness
61 55
Balancing skill
70 63
Building engagement
55 66
Business-oriented thinking
52 61
Communication
43 64
Conflict-management
58 61
Delegating
56 60
Diplomacy
55 65
Emotional intelligence
73 71
Empowerment
42 59
Entrepreneurship (Risk-taking)
69 65
Execution
55 61
Feedback
82 67
Future orientation
68 67
Information gathering
52 72
Intuitive thinking
57 61
Involvement
65 69
Motivation
57 67
Organizing
60 66
Prioritizing
53 56
Recognizing personal strengths
68 67
Social dynamics
63 66
Stakeholder management
60 63
Strategic thinking
71 62
Teamwork management
48 61
Time management
38 56
Time-pressured decision-making
65 57
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18
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3.3. DISTRIBUTION CURVE AND PERCENTILE RANKINGS
Your scores are systematically juxtaposed with all FLIGBY players’ average as well
as median scores. In this Report, the term “average” is the arithmetic mean, while
the “median” shows the dividing point – the middle number – where the exact
same number of players have higher as well as lower scores. The basic advantage
of the median in describing data compared with the mean (often simply described
as the “average”) is that it is not skewed so much by extremely large or small
values, and so it may give a better idea of a ‘typical’ value.
THIS GRAPH SHOWS THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE MEASURED SKILL VALUES
OF ALL FLIGBY PLAYERS
0
25
50
75
100
YOUR SCORE
MEDIAN VALUE
Your “percentile ranking” shows that you did better than the percentage of all
players shown.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
19
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3.4. YOUR TOP 3 SKILLS IDENTIFIED, COMPARED AND EXPLAINED
1
Your Score:
FEEDBACK
Feedback to employees is information regarding
their performance that they can also act on.
Feedback must be shared in a manner that is
understandable and perceived by them as being
provided in a highly respectful manner. As an
organization seeks to improve its performance,
feedback helps it to make the required adjustments.
Feedback is immediate. It is difficult for people to
stay absorbed in any activity unless they get timely,
“online” information about how well they are doing.
The sense of total involvement of the flow
experience derives in large part from knowing that
what one does matters and has consequences.
Feedback may come from colleagues or supervisors
who comment on performance, but preferably it is
the activity itself that will provide this information.
FEEDBACK
#1
82
fl
67
Database Median Score:
68
Your Percentile Ranking:
89
Explanation of the Feedback distribution curve
Most people’s overall Feedback score is between 43 and 88. In fact, 95% of all
people have Feedback within that range. 51% of people score between 58 and 74.
0
25
50
75
100
82
68
43
Report for Derrick Newkirk
58
74
88
20
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
2
Your Score:
STRATEGIC THINKING
Strategic thinking helps managers to set goals, to
determine priorities, to review policy issues, and to
perform long term planning. Clear goals are
necessary to reach the flow-state. For a person to
become deeply involved in any activity it is essential
that he or she knows precisely what tasks he or she
must accomplish moment by moment. Of course the
ultimate goals of an activity are also important but
true enjoyment comes from the steps one takes
toward attaining a goal, not from actually reaching it.
STRATEGIC THINKING
#1
71
fl
62
Database Median Score:
61
Your Percentile Ranking:
75
Explanation of the Strategic thinking distribution curve
Most people’s overall Strategic thinking score is between 42 and 82. In fact, 94%
of all people have Strategic thinking within that range. 51% of people score
between 53 and 67.
0
25
50
75
100
71
61
42
Report for Derrick Newkirk
53
67
82
21
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3
Your Score:
TIME-PRESSURED DECISION-MAKING
Decision-making under time pressure is a readiness
that enables effective decision-making when limited
time and inadequate information is available. This is
the skill to decide authoritatively and to be
consistent with one’s decisions.
TIME-PRESSURED DECISIONMAKING
#1
65
fl
57
Database Median Score:
57
Your Percentile Ranking:
71
Explanation of the Time-pressured decision-making distribution curve
Most people’s overall Time-pressured decision-making score is between 36 and
77. In fact, 94% of all people have Time-pressured decision-making within that
range. 50% of people score between 48 and 63.
0
25
50
75
100
65
57
36
Report for Derrick Newkirk
48
63
77
22
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3.5. YOUR MOST TO-BE-IMPROVED SKILLS IDENTIFIED, COMPARED AND EXPLAINED
1
Your Score:
COMMUNICATION
Communication skills are the set of skills that
enables a person to convey information so that it is
received and understood. Communication skills refer
to the repertoire of interpersonal behavior.
COMMUNICATION
#1
43
fl
64
Database Median Score:
64
Your Percentile Ranking:
3
Explanation of the Communication distribution curve
Most people’s overall Communication score is between 43 and 86. In fact, 95% of
all people have Communication within that range. 58% of people score between
54 and 72.
0
25
50
75
100
43
64
43
Report for Derrick Newkirk
54
72
86
23
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
2
Your Score:
INFORMATION GATHERING
Information gathering is the readiness to collect
adequate information to perform the next step
based on this information. Managers must know
what information to gather, where to find it, how to
collect it, and ultimately how to process the
collected information.
INFORMATION GATHERING
#1
52
fl
72
Database Median Score:
71
Your Percentile Ranking:
4
Explanation of the Information gathering distribution curve
Most people’s overall Information gathering score is between 48 and 87. In fact,
94% of all people have Information gathering within that range. 51% of people
score between 66 and 78.
0
25
50
75
100
52
71
48
Report for Derrick Newkirk
66 78
87
24
3. Your Leadership Skills Profile
3
Your Score:
TIME MANAGEMENT
Time management is a readiness of systematic,
priority-based structuring of time allocation and
distribution among competing demands.
TIME MANAGEMENT
#1
38
fl
56
Database Median Score:
60
Your Percentile Ranking:
8
Explanation of the Time management distribution curve
Most people’s overall Time management score is between 41 and 78. In fact, 93%
of all people have Time management within that range. 53% of people score
between 53 and 69.
0
25
50
75
100
38
60
41
Report for Derrick Newkirk
53
69
78
25
4. If You Want to Know More
4.1. A GAME-BASED APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING YOUR LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL
FLIGBY was designed to identify your leadership skills and potential. The Game creates
an environment that offers a new type of platform for observing management
behavior. The Player gets totally absorbed into the story (indicated by the fact that the
global average actual playing time is 06 h 31 m), concentrating on handling the
decisions that you had to make.
This approach is not distorted by you, the Player, feeling observed or thinking that you
must respond as expected (which is a source of bias when leadership skills are
determined on the basis of answers in simple questionnaires).
In FLIGBY, each Player‘s leadership profile is comprised of his or her scores on each of
the 29 leadership competences that supports the creation and maintenance of a valuebased and Flow-promoting organizational culture. Incidentally, most of the 29 skills so
identified overlap a great deal with those leadership skills that most other, well-known
skillsets cover. This means that your FLIGBY skillset is likely to be aligned, or can be
aligned, with your organization’s own competency listing.
One of the first steps in developing FLIGBY was identifying those 29 skills. Each
Player’s skill profile was automatically generated at the end of the Simulation.
On each of the approximately 80+ of the more than 150 decisions that you, the GM,
had to make in the Game, there were from two to five choices. On each decision, two
independent FLIGBY expert teams ranked the answers from the “most appropriate” to
the “least appropriate”.
On the decisions subject to scoring a Player’s skills, the two independent expert groups
agreed on what would be the “best” decisions.
Most such decisions are assumed to require (and thus reflect) anywhere from one to a
half-a-dozen of the 29 leadership skills. In each instance when you chose the “most
preferred” answer, you earned a point or more for the decision. For each particular
skill, the maximum number of points that could be earned was standardized at 100%.
This has made it possible to determine your percentage score on each skill.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
26
4. If You Want to Know More
4.2. MORE ABOUT WINNING THE SPIRIT OF THE WINE AWARD
The “Spirit of the Wine Award” is a fictional international winery prize we developed
especially for FLIGBY to highlight the importance of a value-based and Flow-promoting
organizational culture.
The formula for winning the Award reflects how well your decisions could balance
among the four target objectives, each measured by its own KPI (key performance
indicators):
1. profitability at the end of the Game;
2. the “corporate atmosphere” by the Game’s end, linked to the GM being able to
create and maintain a Flow-friendly work environment for all key stakeholders;
3. the number of Flow trophies won throughout the Game;
4. Sum Flow Index at the end of the Game.
The illustration below depicts the Award’s components.
It is important to stress that your “skills profile” is not
directly linked to winning or not winning the Award.
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4. If You Want to Know More
4.3. MORE ABOUT THE “HIT” PERCENTAGE OF YOUR DECISIONS
There are only 80+ among the 150+ decisions that have “preferred solutions”. The
80+ decisions are those on which your “skills” were measured. (For the remaining
70 or so decisions, some do not require any leadership skill, while some others are
complex dilemmas on which there are no generally applicable “good” solutions).
The “hit” percentage shown below indicates the proportion (out of the theoretical
maximum of 100%) where you “hit” the preferred solution.
METRIX POINTS %
#1
57
fl
63
Report for Derrick Newkirk
A higher value supposes more effective
decisions by a manager or leader.
28
4. If You Want to Know More
4.4. MORE ABOUT THE “FLOW MAP”
One of the preconditions for Flow states to occur is that there should be a good
match between the kinds of challenges a person faces and the skillset he or she
has. For a Flow state to recur, it is necessary for a person to be willing and able to
move, over time, to higher combinations of challenges and skills.
An important objective of the Game was to create a work environment that is able
to help colleagues to get into a Flow state from time to time. Prof. Csikszentmihalyi
has studied the Flow state of a typical individual, juxtaposing it with seven other
“moods” of such persons:
Apathy – Comparable to a state of indifference and a lack of interest
Worry – By worrying, the attention is shifted towards negativity; (imaginary) problems
become bigger and solutions do not seem to exist
Anxiety – May cause someone to freeze and stagnate
Arousal – By increased stimuli, people respond more attentively to their environment
Flow – Mental state in which people are completely focused on the activity or task
Control – By practicing, skills eventually will be applied in a routine manner, with the
risk that the skills level is higher than the challenge to perform a certain task
Relaxation – Calm; the absence of excitement
Boredom – No interest in surroundings, dull, fatigued
FLIGBY’s “dashboard” was created and arranged according to these eight moods.
Each character’s location on the Map changes dynamically, in harmony with the
story and your decisions. It was possible during the Game to follow on the
dashboard how your decisions affected the current “state of mind” (mood) of your
team members. When one of them entered into a Flow state as a result of your
leadership decision, you obtained a “Flow trophy”.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
29
ELLEN
AROUSAL
Y
ET
XI
O
FL
N
A
W
JOE
HIGH
CHALLENGES
4. If You Want to Know More
LARRY
WORRY
CONTROL
REBECCA
CHRIS
RE
PA
TH
Y
XA
LA
A
LOW
BOREDOM
LOW
N
JEN
O
TI
ALEX
SKILLS
HIGH
The Map shows the eight-fold classification of your team members’ changing
“moods” during a typical day at work, while engaged in various types of activities,
each activity involving different combinations of challenges and skills.
Not every person will find himself or herself in all the mood states during a given
day. Also, the relative importance of various mood states will differ from person to
person (partly as a function of their personalities and motivation); some may
seldom or practically never enter a given mood state.
Quite a few of your decisions in the Game did affect the temporary Flow Map
position of one or several colleagues on your team. And as you made subsequent
decisions, each character either remained in his/her present position or moved to a
new position. How your colleagues reacted to your decisions was largely a
function of their individual personalities and motivations (about which you learned
something when they introduced themselves at the start of the Game, and learned
more as you interacted with them during the Game). How your decisions
concretely impacted the moods of your colleagues was established by the
consensus judgment of an expert group of psychologists and experienced business
executives.
The eight positions on the Flow Map are hierarchical, in terms of energy levels, in
relation to the “ideal” Flow state (next illustration).
Report for Derrick Newkirk
30
4. If You Want to Know More
HIERARCHICAL RELATION OF THE
EIGHT PSYCHOLOGICAL MOODS
HIGH ENERGY LEVEL
Highly motivated state,
involvement, strong
personal commitment to
the task – Extraordinary
individual and
organizational results
Demotivation, no
involvement, no
commitment to the task –
Low individual and
organizational results
FLOW
+5
AROUSAL – CONTROL
+2
ANXIETY – RELAXATION
0
WORRY – BOREDOM
-2
APATHY
-5
LOW ENERGY LEVEL
The numbers are somewhat arbitrary indicators of the energy levels of key
individuals, generated by the GM’s decisions. If key persons find themselves in
“apathy”, that would weaken the actual performance of the team or the entire
organization. In the same vein, Flow, or a movement toward its state, creates extra
sources of energy for fulfilling tasks. One of your Game objectives was to
shepherd your team members toward a Flow state. The numbers on the Illustration
above are indicative, that is, they are not precise measurements; they are ordinal
rankings, indicating approximate hierarchical relationships.
4.5. MORE ABOUT YOUR “SUM FLOW” INDEX
SUM FLOW %
#1
100
fl
72
The “Sum Flow Index” is a special KPI for summarizing
the “energy level” generated by your virtual team
members at different fields of the Flow Map during your
gameplay. This indicator shows what percentage of the
eight characters’ aggregate maximum “energy level”
(“Flow-potential”) you could “mobilize” by your
decisions. “Sum Flow” percentage shows the extent to
which you have managed to take advantage of the
team’s maximum Flow-potential during the Game.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
31
4. If You Want to Know More
4.6. YOUR COLLEAGUES’ FINAL POSITIONS ON THE FLOW MAP
N
A
W
– FLOW
– CONTROL
JEN
– AROUSAL
WORRY
Y
ALEX
TH
PA
– RELAXATION
XA
LA
– CONTROL
CHRIS
CONTROL
REBECCA
E
XI
O
LARRY
– FLOW
AROUSAL
TY
FL
JOE
– FLOW
RE
ELLEN
HIGH
CHALLENGES
OPTIMAL THEORETICAL MAXIMUM POSITIONS AT THE END OF THE GAME
A
O
TI
BOREDOM
LOW
N
SKILLS
HIGH
LOW
– FLOW
– FLOW
ALEX
– CONTROL
JEN
– AROUSAL
WORRY
Y
TH
– RELAXATION
PA
CHRIS
XA
LA
– CONTROL
RE
REBECCA
N
A
CONTROL
LARRY
Y
ET
XI
W
JOE
AROUSAL
O
– FLOW
FL
ELLEN
HIGH
CHALLENGES
POSITIONS BASED ON YOUR DECISIONS AT THE END OF THE GAME
A
O
TI
LOW
BOREDOM
Report for Derrick Newkirk
N
LOW
SKILLS
HIGH
32
4. If You Want to Know More
By the end of the Game, all your team members had arrived at their latest
destination on the Flow Map. One feedback you might be interested in is the
extent to which their locations on the Flow Map had approached their highest
reachable position on the Map. The greater the attention you paid, and the higher
priority you gave in your decisions to move your colleagues into or toward Flow,
the “best” would be their ending “mood” position on the Flow Map.
It is important to note that members of your team had conflicting motivations and
interests. Thus, it was simply not possible to move all your team members into or
toward the Flow state. Therefore, in making decisions, you often had to choose
which of the two opponents, or perhaps neither of them, should be moved toward
Flow.
The illustration above shows the final Flow Map status of each of your team
members, decided by the successive combinations of decisions you made
throughout the Game. The first part of the Illustration shows the theoretical
maximum (de facto unattainable) Flow state of your team members.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
33
4. If You Want to Know More
4.7. THE 29 LEADERSHIP SKILLS: DEFINITIONS
Active listening – Active listening is a way of responding to another person that improves mutual
understanding. This is a method of listening that involves understanding the content of a message
as well as the intent of the sender and the circumstances under which the message is given. Active
listening is a structured form of listening and responding that focuses the attention on the speaker.
The listener does not have to agree with the speaker – he or she must simply state what he or she
thinks the speaker said.
Analytical skill – Analytical skill is the readiness to visualize, articulate, and solve complex problems
and concepts and make decisions that are sensible based on the available information. Such skills
include demonstration of the ability to apply logical thinking to gathering and analyzing information,
designing and testing solutions to problems, and formulating plans.
Assertiveness – Assertiveness is the readiness to express your emotions and needs without
violating the rights of others and without being aggressive. Assertiveness is the behavior which
enables you to act in your own best interests, to stand up for yourself without undue anxiety, to
express your honest feelings comfortably, or to exercise your own rights without denying the rights
of others.
Balancing skill – Balancing skill is the readiness to maintain the same importance between things,
considering them in the same way. Effective leadership is about balance. A balance between
challenges and skills is necessary for Flow. It is easier to become completely involved in a task if we
believe it is doable. If it appears to be beyond our capacity we tend to respond to it by feeling
anxious; if the task is too easy we get bored. In either case attention shifts from what needs to be
accomplished—the anxious person is distracted by worries about the outcome, while the bored one
starts searching for other things to do. The ideal condition can be expressed by the simple formula:
Flow occurs when both challenges and skills are high and equal to each other.
Building engagement – Building engagement is the readiness to create trust and a positive,
fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by dedication. Dedication refers to being
strongly involved in one’s work and experiencing a sense of significance, enthusiasm, and challenge.
Building someone’s (the colleagues, the community) confidence in or reliance on some quality or
attribute of a person or a thing, or the truth in a statement.
Business-oriented thinking – Business-oriented thinking is the readiness to manage situations and
solve problems in order to create added value to the company and in the end, create value for the
shareholders/stakeholders. To be successful in business development you need to manage the
opportunities and threats of the corporate environment and to recognize organizational
weaknesses to avoid, and strengths to build upon.
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4. If You Want to Know More
Communication – Communication skills are the set of skills that enables a person to convey
information so that it is received and understood. Communication skills refer to the repertoire of
interpersonal behavior.
Conflict-management – Conflict-management is the practice of identifying and handling conflicts in
a sensible, fair, and efficient manner. Conflict management is the principle that all conflicts cannot
necessarily be resolved, but learning how to manage conflicts can decrease the odds of
nonproductive escalation.
Delegating – Delegation is the readiness to confer functions or powers on another person so he or
she can act on behalf of the manager. Delegation empowers a subordinate to make decisions, i.e. it
is a shift of decision-making authority from one organizational level to a lower one.
Diplomacy – Diplomacy is the readiness to take into account the varying interests and values of the
other parties involved in the negotiation, treating those differences with respect and dealing with
people in a tactful manner.
Emotional intelligence – Emotional intelligence is the capacity and readiness to understand, express
and regulate emotions in oneself and in others.
Empowerment – Empowerment is a skill of sharing information, rewards, and power with
employees so that they can take initiative and make decisions to solve problems and improve
service and performance.
Entrepreneurship (Risk-taking) – Entrepreneurship is a capacity and willingness to undertake
conception, organization, and management of a productive venture with all attendant risks, while
seeking profit as a reward. Entrepreneurial spirit is characterized by innovation and risk-taking, and
an essential component to succeed in an ever changing and more competitive global marketplace.
Execution – Execution is the act of performing, the completion of managerial tasks (execution of a
plan, a task, etc.), and the readiness of doing something successfully. Managing the business aligned
with the common values. Executing strategic goals is by far the greatest challenge in business
today.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
35
4. If You Want to Know More
Feedback – Feedback to employees is information regarding their performance that they can also
act on. Feedback must be shared in a manner that is understandable and perceived by them as
being provided in a highly respectful manner. As an organization seeks to improve its performance,
feedback helps it to make the required adjustments. Feedback is immediate. It is difficult for people
to stay absorbed in any activity unless they get timely, “online” information about how well they are
doing. The sense of total involvement of the flow experience derives in large part from knowing
that what one does matters and has consequences. Feedback may come from colleagues or
supervisors who comment on performance, but preferably it is the activity itself that will provide
this information.
Future orientation – Future orientation is the readiness to think in long terms. This is the skill of
“forward-looking”.
Information gathering – Information gathering is the readiness to collect adequate information to
perform the next step based on this information. Managers must know what information to gather,
where to find it, how to collect it, and ultimately how to process the collected information.
Intuitive thinking – Intuitive thinking is a way of thinking that does not use rational processes such
as facts and data. It is unfocused, nonlinear, sees many things at once, views the big picture and
contains perspective. Good intuition comes from years of knowledge and experience that allows
you to understand how people and the world works. Its strength is that it can produce a rapid
result. It is acting on feelings or hunches. It can also be guided by emotions.
Involvement – Involvement is the readiness to participate in the activities of formal or informal
teams/groups, all the way to the execution process.
Motivation – Motivational skills are those that enable a person to become motivated and work
toward achieving goals. This is the readiness to understand what causes a person to become
motivated and stay that way. It helps with making sure people are the most productive that they
can be.
Organizing – Organizing is the readiness to initiate, arrange and manage several elements into a
purposeful structure. This is the ability to create throughout the organization a network of people
who can help solve implementation problems as they occur. Good implementers customize this
network to include individuals who can handle the special types of problems anticipated in the
implementation of a particular strategy.
Prioritizing – Prioritization is the readiness to evaluate a group of items and ranking them in their
order of importance or urgency.
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36
4. If You Want to Know More
Recognizing personal strengths – Recognizing and applying personal strengths is the readiness to
discover and to put to good use those personal strengths of others that are not immediately
obvious. It is the realization that those strengths can potentially induce flow states in that other
person and thus benefit the organization.
Social dynamics – An awareness of the complexity of many situations and the social dynamics that
govern them. This skill can be used to advance one’s own interest – for the good or otherwise and/or that of the organization.
Stakeholder management – Stakeholder management is the ability to manage the business process,
often involving trade-off, so as to have a positive impact on the organizations’ stakeholders,
including that of society at large.
Strategic thinking – Strategic thinking helps managers to set goals, to determine priorities, to
review policy issues, and to perform long term planning. Clear goals are necessary to reach the
flow-state. For a person to become deeply involved in any activity it is essential that he or she
knows precisely what tasks he or she must accomplish moment by moment. Of course the ultimate
goals of an activity are also important but true enjoyment comes from the steps one takes toward
attaining a goal, not from actually reaching it.
Teamwork management – Teamwork management is the readiness to form, facilitate and monitor
teamwork and teams.
Time management – Time management is a readiness of systematic, priority-based structuring of
time allocation and distribution among competing demands.
Time-pressured decision-making – Decision-making under time pressure is a readiness that enables
effective decision-making when limited time and inadequate information is available. This is the skill
to decide authoritatively and to be consistent with one’s decisions.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
37
4. If You Want to Know More
4.8. MR. FLIGBY’S “NO-PUNCHES-PULLED” OPINION ON YOU AS A LEADER
Hello Derrick!
You remember, we are sure, that Mr. (Frederick Joseph) Fligby was your virtual consultant when you were Turul
Winery’s new GM during gameplay. Mr. Fligby did not hide his personal opinions about your decisions at the end
each Scene. The wording of his opinions and advice was sometime harsh, as befits his headstrong but basically
knowledgeable and well-meaning personality.
Here he is, back again, with his no-holds-barred personal statements about each of your 29 skills. He makes them –
opinionated as they are – on the basis of the level and the quality of your skills, measured during your gameplay. In
some sentences he praises you; in others (referring to other skills) he is scolding. Don’t interpret those as
contradictions, but as complementarities; shades of you as a complex person, that we all are.
All leadership skills can be improved. We wish you success in your career.
The game-design team
And now we turn it over to Mr. Fligby.
Mr. (Frederick Joseph) Fligby
to Derrick Newkirk
Hello Derrick,
• During conversations you pay attention to your partner.
• You consider planning a waste of time; instead, “Let’s act now, let’s not delay!”
• You can stand up for your rights and interests in ways that avoid conflict.
• According to you, if everyone were assigned tasks best suited to their skills,
organizational performance would quickly improve.
• You seem to believe that the workplace environment is not about being
enthusiastic, that the sole measuring stick is performance.
• You don’t seem to be comfortable in working in situations that constantly pose new
challenges in your internal and external environments.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
38
4. If You Want to Know More
• You need to become more aware of the proposition that “It is impossible not to
communicate!” – Communication cannot be avoided; hence you need to learn is
basics.
• In case of conflicts, you hesitate, become uncertain, and tend to “go with the flow”
(not in Csikszentmihalyi’s meaning of the term).
• Empowering others to make certain decisions that are ultimately your responsibility
could free up resources at no cost to the organization.
• You might be an example of the proverbial “bull in the china shop”; seem to miss
even obvious things.
• You should recognize that greater empathy in the workplace can solve problems;
that emotional intelligence can be developed.
• Are you really convinced that, because information is power, it should not be shared
widely? Withholding information impairs the organization’s timely response to new
developments.
• Modest risk yields modest returns, while the return on high-risk ventures is more
uncertain. Therefore, “be careful” is your mantra.
• You seem to focus equally on holding subordinates responsible for following the
orders given as on the tasks themselves. In certain cases this can hinder task
implementation.
• Your approach to feedback is excellent: it is timely and concrete. Thus, your
feedback encourages outstanding performance.
• The imagined future is dawning, but its details are cloudy still.
• You seem to be buried and bothered by the massive amount of unstructured data
and information you are exposed to.
• You are a fan of straightforward, linear thinking.
• You are not comfortable with teamwork; yet are willing to participate, if
encouraged.
• You seem to think that efforts to motivate others are, by and large, a waste of time.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
39
4. If You Want to Know More
• Key elements of complex tasks you organize often do not seem to fall in place.
• It is important to have clear priorities and structures; everything cannot be
accomplished at once.
• If you happen to discover someone’s hidden personal strengths, you try to make use
of them in the workplace.
• You generally are aware when “threatening emotional clouds” appear at the
workplace.
• Regarding stakeholder management, you seem to believe that it can cause “the cost
of the soup to exceed that of the main entrée”.
• You are pursuing clear and transparent objectives; to reach them, you always know
the tasks at hand.
• Coming up with a consensus on the objective(s) of a team is difficult and time
consuming; you prefer prescribing rules and expect team members to report on their
compliance with them.
• Occasionally, you focus on trivia, rather than on the urgent; you frequently face
time-pressures.
• When quick decisions are called for, you are self-assured and consistent.
Your tongue-in-cheek,
Frederick Joseph Fligby
Report for Derrick Newkirk
40
4. If You Want to Know More
This Report was brought to you by FLIGBY’s Architects:
Zoltan Buzady, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof., Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary;
Director, Leadership & Flow Global Research Network.
Paul Marer, Ph.D., Emeritus Prof., Kelley School of Business, Indiana University,
Bloomington, and CEU Business School; Director, Global Strategic Planning, ALEAS
Simulations Inc., Los Angeles and Budapest.
Zoltan Vecsey, MA, former Program Director, Leadership Development Center,
Budapest University of Economic Sciences; Board member, ALEAS Simulations Inc.
Zsadany Vecsey, MBA, Co-founder and CEO, ALEAS Simulations Inc.
The Report mechanism was coded by Szabolcs Bötkös, FLIGBY’s Chief Software
Architect, MA, Eötvös Loránd University and edited by Katalin Lőrincz, Chief
Development Editor, MA, Eötvös Loránd University and Károli Gáspár University.
For years, our abiding commitment has been to teach and advance Prof. Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi’s concept of Flow and Flow-promoting leadership, both designed to
make people happier, organizations more effective, and societies more just.
Report for Derrick Newkirk
41
kapextmediassl-a.akamaihd.net/business/GB580/GB580_1801D/Unit6_Assignment2_Grading_Rubric.pdf
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! Apps M
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API®Tank
Morning Delights
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GB580: Unit 6 Assignment 2
Grading Rubric
Unit 6 Assignment 2
Points
Earned
FLIGBY Score
0 – 20
21 – 40
41 – 60
61-140
Corporate Atmosphere
20
25
30
35
Profit
20
25
30
35
Sum Flow
20
25
30
35
Trophies
20
25
30
35
Total
80
100
120
140
Screenshot
Non Folder
D….57.58 PM 2020-

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